Business Planning

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Donald Trump – Making Behavioral Insights Great Again

Part 1 of 3 – How well he knows himself!

Well, the Trumpster beat the odds and has jumped over everyone to win the Presidency. How did he do it? The answer is deeply rooted in Donald Trump’s behavioral insights – his natural, hard-wired Influencer DNA Behavioral Style. These personality insights identify the primary drivers of his good (and bad) leadership decisions, financial dealings and general approach to life.

I’m not running for office. I don’t have to be politically correct. I don’t have to be a nice person. Like I watch some of these weak-kneed politicians, it’s disgusting. I don’t have to be that way.
- Donald Trump

Donald Trump’s Influencer behavioral style has made him successful, but if not managed, could be his downfall. Overall he (is):

Donald Trump Influencer Insights
  • Driven by power and success
  • Very spontaneous and instinctive
  • Extremely creative and an out-of-the-box thinker
  • A take-charge, decisive and a fast-paced decision-maker
  • Works with people to get the results he wants
  • Could be unsympathetic to others needs
  • A strong communicator but lacks filters
  • Very confrontational and prepared to play tough
  • Into achieving economic and political goals. He could risk a lot and be too optimistic
  • Into trying new ways. Sometimes they win, and other times they fail.
  • Has a transactional mindset and could be too impatient when a program does not work out quickly

Donald Trump’s behavioral insights reflect that he is supremely cognizant of these behavioral abilities and uses each to further his personal agenda.

It is clear Trump knows his personality; he knows success is his lifetime goal. Anyone who has even limited behavioral awareness should have known that the election trail was all about the salesman’ getting the sale (the White House). But from here on we’ll see the negotiator because that’s how he knows he will get results. Trump will be a hard-nosed negotiator; whether putting together a White House team or negotiating trade deals on the world stage, he will be reluctant to give in on even the smallest points.

The old idiom my way or the highway will probably be the new White House mantra.
Trump won’t be fearful of taking risks, he will play the odds, some you win and some you lose, but as long as he is always moving forward to the goals and objectives he has set – he’ll feel he is on track.

As a decision maker, Donald Trump will not be readily swayed by sentiment or humanitarian impulses. This will be advantageous when it comes to balancing competing interests or bargaining with adversaries. He is likely to be a bold and ruthlessly aggressive decision maker showing little concern for the emotions of others.
That said – he knows how to keep people on board; he knows how to set others up for success in order to achieve his goals. The result is, a Trump that is equipped to be a strategic player in situations where achieving results is a priority and concentrate on matter-of-fact, practical issues.

Listening to those around him talking about his loyalty, great to work for, cares about me and my family, further demonstrates his ability to manage his personality. Confident, goal-setting people, such as Trump, excel by blending their strong drive to reach key goals with sound knowledge, high-quality processes and quality control standards.

With his outgoing and innovative nature, there is no doubt Trump is the Populist’s choice. Ultimately, he won from his preparedness in the rural areas where Hillary did not go. He won what should have been Democrat territory

Trump v Clinton – The Comparison

98/66 Trump makes fast decisions; sometimes getting it wrong but always moving forward. Clinton hesitates, wanting more information, with a propensity to procrastinate.
73/96 Trump breaks down boundaries and doesn’t wait to anticipate outcomes. Clinton is only interested in knowing the outcome of decisions she might make.
99/54 Trump is all about setting the bar as high as possible in achieving goals. Clinton tends towards keeping things as they are.
62/95 Trump changes direction mid-stream if a better plan is formulated to bring success. Clinton sticks to agreed and established direction and agendas to achieve goals even if they may not work out.
92/66 Trump is open to new ideas if it achieves his goals. Clinton is more stuck in the status quo.
90/66 Trump is not into details, he just wants results and will say what he wants to say even if possibly wrong; decides instinctively. Clinton needs details, analysis, and research in order to make decisions.
90/79 Trump is clear and forthright in expressing and communicating. Clinton is less so, which might cause confusion in mixed messaging.
96/79 Trump is not fazed by conflict. Clinton is less comfortable with conflict.
84/90 Trump is motivated by his own personal interest or advantage, especially without regard for others. Clinton, even more so.
90/92 Neither are empathetic towards issues others face.

To give Mr. President Elect the final word – “No dream is too big, no challenge is too great. America will no longer settle for anything less than the best.”

To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit DNA Behavior.

What Contingent Liabilities are Your Employees Causing

What Contingent Liabilities are Your Employees Causing?

Rogue behavior costing $36 billion in legal bills since the financial crisis should give every Board member and Executive sleepless nights. Then add the cost to hire significant compliance and security management and staff to curb rogue behavior, and some serious questions need to be asked!

  1. What part does pressure to chase profitability encourage a greater level of risk to be taken?
  2. How much risk is the business willing to take? And at what level does risk become reckless?
  3. Is the level of inter-staff competitiveness so great that irresponsible risk is encouraged?
  4. How vigilant are those in leadership to the impact of pressure on employees?

Working in an environment pressurized to succeed at all costs, tends to be the norm, especially in the Financial Sector. Just look at Wells Fargo. Whilst taking risk is a legitimate part of building a successful business and keeping ahead of the competition, when pressure and risk collide it can quickly become a weapon in the wrong hands. Unable to balance risk under pressure to achieve results, the line becomes blurred between acceptable business practices and legal or moral improprieties.

Even more alarming, is when Boards and senior executives fail to acknowledge the environments that promote rogue behavior simply to increase profits. It could be argued that they are as culpable as the rogue employee. Daniel Kahneman, in his book Thinking Fast and Slow, says “we can be blind to the obvious, and we are also blind to our blindness.”

Prosecutions and regulatory enforcement stemming from noncompliance related to employee behavior such as corruption, bribery, rogue trading and insider trading are on the rise around the world. In fiscal 2015, the SEC filed nearly 7% more cases over the prior year, meting out $4.2 billion in sanctions.

People are hired for their talent but little attention is paid to their inherent personality. So when an individual is placed under significant pressure or pushed to take excessive risks, their behavior can turn rogue. The good news? When pressure and risk collide can now be predicted.

Using behavioral insights, management can dynamically match employees with specific environmental conditions to determine their potential response to risk and pressure. They can also discern the degree to which such responses could create rogue behavior and negative actions towards the business.

It is no longer enough to simply look at emails, computer keystrokes, outside influences, sick records etc. – the old hat of international espionage and anti-terrorist tools. What should be clearly understood is that the rogue employee is a human being, that when placed under significant pressure to achieve, will take risks.

The question to Boards and Executives is – do you know your employees?

What corporate entities have in their corner is direct and immediate access to their own personnel from top to bottom and every department – including even outside partners and vendors. So the solution is the deployment of a validated personality discovery process, providing hidden insights and a reliable prediction of where security or compliance risks exist.
Based on external research, employees with the following measurable behavioral traits are more likely to engage in rogue behavior when emotionally triggered

  1. An inventive mind, full of ground-breaking ideas turns their thoughts to curious and devious thinking when, as an example; many of their ideas are rejected.
  2. A go-getting, determined person, driven to success at any cost; begins to cut corners, as a toxic competitive streak takes over.
  3. A reticent, uncommunicative, taciturn minded person normally just seen as the quiet one’ begins to hold onto key information that others need, simply because they have taken offense over something trivial.
Which Employee is Your Molotov Cocktail2

DNA Behavior International’s validated system gets below the surface to reveal behaviors that, if not managed, can lead to ruinous behavior.
The Unique DNA Behavior Approach is able to Score, Filter, and Prioritize Employee Personality Insights.

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Which Employee is Your Molotov Cocktail

Which Employee is Your Molotov Cocktail?

Potentially 5% of your workforce includes employees that are a high-security risk. The cost of all types of fraud is a staggering 5% of turnover, per the 2014 Global Fraud Study by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE.) So, what’s the cost of rogue employee behavior to your business? Simply identifying the personality type most likely to cross the line and the triggers that push them there could save you big dollars and your reputation. Or better yet, how do you help an employee to align their strengths to a given role and avoid rogue behavior altogether?

While larger businesses are investing more in cyber security and other monitoring programs, virtually nothing is being put towards identifying and monitoring costly employee behavior risks. The problem is that many of these insider threats are already in your business and the situation is gaining momentum without anyone being the wiser. The Global State of Information Security Survey 2015 recommends that 23% of the annual spend on business security should be directed to behavioral profiling and monitoring of employees.

Research shows that the following problems are caused by human behavior:

  • Combinations of human behavioral factor outliers and external environmental factors (e.g. financial difficulty) trigger emotions causing negative behavior toward the company.
  • Combinations of employees with too similar or too different styles working in a high-risk environment cause internal control issues.

Which Employee is Your Molotov Cocktail

The solution is the deployment of a validated personality discovery process, providing insights to hidden, hard-wired traits and a reliable prediction of where security or compliance risks exist. Based on external research, employees with the following measurable behavioral traits are more likely to engage in rogue behavior when emotionally triggered:

  1. Innovative – bright mind, which turns into curious and devious thinking
  2. Ambitious – desire for success, leading to cutting corners
  3. Secretive – working under cover and not revealing key information

The reality is that any person with a weak or temporarily broken character in the wrong team or facing external pressure can make flawed decisions and therefore, become the source of costly negative behavior. The employee behavior review using personality assessment methodologies should be uniformly applied to every employee in the business from the top down to distill the “hot spot” areas. The high performing leaders down through the sales and operations teams to the disgruntled bookkeeper are not exempt – New hires, or old guard, every last one. You only have to look at the recent headlines regarding Wells Fargo, Volkswagen, and JP Morgan. I am regularly seeing it in the financial services industry and the privately held businesses with whom we partner.

Which Employee is Your Molotov Cocktail2

Using behavioral insights, management can dynamically match employees with specific environmental conditions to determine their potential response. They can also discern the degree to which such responses could create rogue behavior and negative actions towards the business. Lastly, management can apply these insights towards talent re-allocation, employee evaluation, team development and improved hiring processes.

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Dysfunctional Boardroom Behavior – 5 Steps to Manage

A dysfunctional board of directors can cause multiple challenges for any organization.
Industry leaders, celebrities, and subject experts often make up Boards. Many of these individuals are not accustomed to having their opinions challenged. So while they may add credibility, there’re not always a mutual fit.

Dysfunction arises when:

  • Individual behaviors, cognitive biases, decision-making styles and communication styles are not in sync.
  • Decisions are inconsistent or simply not made.
  • Board members have conflicting agendas.
  • There is lack of leadership from the Chair, no mutual respect and lack of trust.
  • Individuals react inappropriately under pressure.
  • Boardroom bullies are not managed or members just sit back and watch.

A 2009 Gallup Research paper revealed a 70% productivity gain when groups of people working together understood and were able to close the behavior performance gap. This study holds true today.

Every board plays an integral role in the success of the organization. When Board members are dysfunctional and not engaged, the flow on to the organization can be significant.

5 Steps to managing boardroom behavior.

  1. Commit to being behaviorally smart in the boardroom.
  2. Use a validated natural discovery process to assess key personality traits.
  3. Use the outcomes to build a balanced relationship between all players.
  4. Appoint a highly skilled facilitator to work with individual directors to understand communication and behavioral styles.
  5. Commit to building a culture of understanding, acceptance, and respect.

Understanding different personalities can lead to better decision-making. Directors cannot fulfill their responsibilities in a boardroom where a few dysfunctional members are allowed to control the meeting or obstruct board decision-making.

MANAGING ADVISOR TURNOVER USING MATCHING RELATIONSHIPS

Managing Advisor Turnover using Matching Relationships

Does your firm face the standard insurance industry problem that only 10 to 15% of the advisors and agents who start in the business are still with them after 5 years? Then, of those who stay after 5 years, how many are strongly committed to your firm? Or, are they producing at the desired rate?

Meeting this challenge starts with improving how the home office uniquely manages each advisor in the field. Then, it is about helping the field force be more successful in engaging their clients (policy holders).

In recent times, we have been helping some of the worlds leading insurance firms significantly boost the levels of field force engagement, thereby leading to more profitable business relationships. Our approach has been to help these insurance firms embrace behavioral marketing and talent segmentation strategies based on validated behavioral science insights. These strategies start by discovering the unique communication and learning style of each person in their field force enabling the firm can more deeply connect with them and provide greater sales assistance.

Being specific, by segmenting each person into one of 4 primary communication styles we have helped these leading insurance firms to:

1. ?Create customized marketing plans which re-frame the key messages for each advisor in the field force

2. ?Provide tailored sales programs and presentations for each advisor based on their style so that they can then adapt to the style of each prospect and customer

3. ?Match the talents and communication style of each advisor to their ideal clients to improve the chances of deeper levels of connection with less energy

4. ?Align advisors to the types of insurance product solutions that they would optimally sell based on their specific behavioral talents

5. ?Help advisors to form teams with other advisors who have different talents so that they can capitalize on more opportunities as a collective unit

6. ?Build online communities for advisors and clients to meet, and be continuously educated

7. ?Develop hiring and retention metrics to ensure that the best talent is retained and resourced for success

If you would like to schedule a conversation with one of our Relationship Management Integrators to explore how our suite of DNA Behavior Solutions generates significant ROI benefits, then please email us at inquiries@dnabehavior.com .

5 Keys to Behaviorally Smart Hiring: Don’t rely solely on resumes, concentrate on who the person is

Great resumes can be bought. Behaviors can’t be.

The only way to effectively hire and retain candidates is to ensure you not only fit the right skills to the right job but that you also find the right cultural and behavioral style fit for the role and team.

Validating behavioral intelligence will deepen engagement in each human interaction the candidate will have in the business as part of their performance. A person’s skills will be a moot point if he or she can’t effectively interact with the team and/or customers or if the person is a social butterfly when a task-oriented person is needed.? The process of exploring and validating behavioral intelligence should also uncover life and business decision-making patterns as this could determine whether or not a candidate will be a long-term, loyal, and successful hire.

Happy Candidate in the Right Role

Key 1: Alignment of vision and life direction; engaging head, heart, and talent

Ask questions to discover if the vision and direction the candidate has for his or her life aligns with the vision and direction of the organization. Another important question to investigate is whether the organization can deliver its part to bring a successful outworking of the candidate’s vision and life direction? If the answer is yes, then not only will it be a great hire, but likely a long-term relationship. An individual is less likely to consider leaving when he or she is a part of working towards a shared key goal or milestone.

Key 2: Uncover life and decision making patterns

Understanding how to communicate effectively is the most valuable route to uncovering behaviors, decision making patterns and strengthening engagement. Knowing the communication style of each candidate prior to the hiring interview will enable the interviewing panel to customize their questions to the individual’s communication style.

To be able to effectively uncover life and decision making patterns, it’s important to understand how to communicate and the right questions to ask.Gaining insight into the communication and behavioral style of a candidate will reveal how well the individual/ he or she will fit with colleagues and respond to managers and supervisors.

Key 3: Match behaviors as well as talents to the role–having the skills to do the job isn’t enough

It is best to keep in mind, however, that having the skills to do the job isn’t enough. People want to work with meaning. Jobseekers will apply for positions they feel match their skills, but often the hiring process fails to match both talents and behaviors to the job. Whilst organizations need to secure the talent necessary for the success of the business, matching behaviors, as well as talents to roles, builds foundational blocks for long-term success.

Key 4: Don’t hire yourself

The trap many hiring panels fall into is assuming that a great exchange between candidate and hiring panel translates to best role fit. To avoid this pitfall, the interview panel needs to understand their own individual and collective behavior, communication and decision-making style in advance. This awareness will enable the panel to adapt their communication and interviewing style to the candidates. It is natural to feel more comfortable with communication that mirrors one’s own style. Conversely, it’s also the case that there could be an adverse response to communication styles that do not align.

Key 5: Be known as a champion organization; one that has candidates lining up to get in. Everyone wants to work for a winner.

Be Known as a Champion Organization

Understand and implement each of these 5 keys, and you are more likely to hire effectively and retain top talent. People want to work for an organization that values talent, communicates effectively, and is known not only for its success in business but its inherent ability to know, understand and engage with employees to get the very best out of them/unlock their potential. Having a reputation as an organization that delivers their employees vision, in addition to delivering the vision of the business, will attract top talent.

Key 1: Alignment of vision and life direction; engaging head, heart, and talent.

Key 2: Uncover life and decision making patterns.

Key 3: Match behaviors as well as talents to the role; having the skills to do the job isn’t enough.

Key 4: Don’t hire yourself

Key 5: Be known as a champion organization; one that has candidates lining up to get in. Everyone wants to for a winner.

There’s no such thing as the perfect candidate. Look for candidates who can perform at the job with a bit of training and practice but have a communication and behavioral style that’s the best fit for your current team dynamics.

Remember: Great resumes can be bought. Behaviors cannot be.