Hiring / Recruitment

Top 20 Behavioral Interview Questions to Identify High-Potential Practice Managers

The talent management process companies go through has come under much scrutiny over the last year. It is no longer a matter of finding the right candidates for the right role, managers have started taking into consideration the behavioral aspect as well. If you too are ready to embrace the right hiring strategy to meet the needs of this new season, below are the top 20 behavioral interview questions you should be asking.

Why prioritize behavioral questions?

We’ve heard it times and times again: “Great businesses are built on people”. This entails that matching the right experience and skills to the right role is what makes successful teams. However, the traditional process of screening candidates lacks an essential component that identifies high potential candidates. A behavioral assessment. 

It is not only a matter of understanding your candidates’ behavioral tendencies, you should also be able to anticipate how they would react in a given situation. When recruiting a practice manager, you are recruiting for a client-facing role that requires certain agility in customer service. Knowing that behavioral intelligence deepens engagement in each human interaction makes it a must-have personality trait in your next hire. Only a behavioral assessment can accurately predict whether or not your candidate has what it takes to fill this role.

Make no mistake, this doesn’t mean that their resume is not worth taking into consideration. However, a person’s skills are a moot point if they can’t fulfill the behavioral requirements of the role, which in this case is effectively interacting with customers.

What behavioral indicators should you be looking for?

The behavioral questions you should be asking your next candidates help determine specific insights. Each role requires a given behavioral style that can only be uncovered through the right assessment. Before we dive into the questions you should be asking, let’s discuss those behavioral indicators.

Adaptability 

Many hiring managers will admit that adaptability is unanimously the most screened-for skill. Even from a business perspective, in order to stay competitive, companies need to continuously adapt to the changing economy and market needs. It only makes sense to ensure new hires are inherently capable of adapting.

Culture & values 

Company culture is an essential component of building successful teams. When screening candidates, you need to ensure they share the same beliefs and values as your organization, but also bring a diversity of thought and experience that will drive your company forward. 

Collaboration

Hiring people who can collaborate effectively and work well with others is essential to success. This sense of teamwork may not come naturally to every candidate you interview. While we all make efforts to effectively work with our teams, some individuals have an inherent ability to prioritize it and marvel in a collaborative environment.

Leadership

There is no doubt that great leaders make great companies. When hiring for a managerial position, leadership is not only a soft skill your candidates should have, it needs to be part of their behavioral style for a successful team. Leaders are expected to inspire, motivate and unleash potential in others. It cannot be taught.

Development 

A successful interview assessment not only uncovers your candidates’ skills, but it should also pinpoint development and growth potential. In today’s fast-paced work environment, it’s become expected of your employees to potentially grow into new roles and leadership positions. A behavioral assessment enables you to predict if a candidate has what it takes by screening for goal setting and self-motivation.

Productivity

Each role demands a certain level of multitasking. Candidates should be able to not only manage their time but also prioritize their tasks and decide which ones need to be tackled immediately, and which ones can wait. Hiring someone who can’t get this right means that key due dates and project timelines can fall through the cracks, ultimately hurting your business. People who can manage their time and prioritize effectively will help your business thrive.

What behavioral interview questions should you be asking?

Even though each role is different, these behavioral interview questions can help you identify high-potential candidates. Download the full list below.

What’s Next?

So you’ve gone through the interview process, you’ve asked the right behavioral questions, and got all the answers you needed. You might be wondering by now, what’s next? 

The next step is to determine the candidates’ behavioral styles. Through 500+ insights, the DNA Behavior discovery process allows you to uncover significant aspects of their natural behaviors and assess whether or not they are the fit for your company. Start your free trial today, and take the guess out of your hiring strategy.

Remote Working

Invest In and Trust Your Workforce

This article first appeared on HR Management App.

Remote work is really about trust. Are they doing their job? Are they slacking off?
Sometimes leaders don’t support remote working because they feel the need to be in control.

As the CEO of a global company I have key executives working remotely. The executive team meet regularly via voice and video chat apps. The team leaders meet daily for 10 minutes with an executive.

I am in regular contact with my managing director and at least once a week with the full executive team. If time zones get in the way of face-to-face meetings, we record them, and the links await the team member when they are back at their desk.

Technology is the key enabler of remote working. Fast wi-fi connections, project management software and other tech tools help us communicate and collaborate instantaneously.

So, how do we make this work?

Well, it helps that we are in the business of accelerating human performance. We deliver real-time management solutions through validated behavioral insights to connect, customize and power human performance.

So, I hire the right people. But you don’t have to be in my industry to get remote work right.

And not everyone has the behavior to be comfortable working remotely. They want and need the interaction of working in an office with a team around them. Wherever I can, we accommodate this.

Others are comfortable with and excel in the remote experience. They are able to function alone but also want to know they can interact with colleagues as and when they need to.

I ensure communication is robust. Each staff member has access to connect with their colleagues as they wish. Any instructions or guidance is imparted using a variety of styles, words, pictures, videos – whatever is needed to get messages across. People think and give and receive information differently.

All staff are hired not just for their talents and credentials, but also for the “fit” to the benchmarked role they will fill. They are also profiled using a validated system to ensure their behaviors meet our cultural and behavioral standards. The outcomes also show those whose inherent behavior is more suited to remote working.

Ask them to “talk back”

All executives and team leaders are required to take part in our 360-degree performance review. Regardless of where they sit in the world or where their staff are, we continuously check to make sure everyone feels valued and supported.

The greatest gift I can give to my team is to trust them. In return my employees are happier and loyal. Stress levels are low, and they work hard and have the space to play hard and keep their life in balance.

I was skeptical in the beginning but after eighteen years of remote working in some form or other, I’m persuaded every leader should consider using this form of working with their teams.

Invest in a discovery process that optimizes your people and procedures, including shorter term check-ins and long-view feedback loops. You’ll be investing in your team members and they, in turn, will be more invested in you.

Behavioral Science

Behavioral Science Teams Increasingly Important to Financial Services

This article first appeared on Nasdaq.

Behavioral sciences teams can influence business strategy, decision-making and service offerings through deep insight into human behavior. Such a teams ability to understand behaviors helps mitigate failure and decrease industry waste.

The more innovative financial services companies are starting to appoint behavioral teams. They understand the power of applying behavioral science to improve customer and employee behavior.

Why add the behavioral facet?

Real-world financial decisions are complex. Investors look to advisors to inform their decisions. They want to make the most of their money to achieve goals and build for their future.

But how can each party build trust sufficient to share life goals? And the other provide corresponding advice that delivers those goals? How can customers be sure their finances are being managed within a culture of integrity, honesty and trustworthiness?

Never has there been a greater need for the financial services industry to prove it can be trusted.

What will be revealed…

Using behavioral science to identify and weed out misconduct is just one aspect, though it may be the most familiar. Being able to better understand people to inform the culture of the business is another side of behavioral science, and a fundamental aspect of building trust.

But the big one – and the one that will build and sustain business – is being able to use behavioral science to better understand customer behavior and to advise them how to make better decisions. Relying on big data itself is not enough. Big data is stronger when paired with little data, if you will; that is, behavioral insights and overlays that are sourced from personality discovery.

Interventions to foster better customer decisions have been around for a long time; behavioral science has opened our eyes to human differences and complexities.

Science, not soft

The application of this approach to the advisor-client relationship is new. The market now offers validated, scientific profiling systems that will identify not just decision making, but also how individuals react under pressure. This information is delivered to the advisor in real time at their fingertips.

Building a trusting and trusted culture based on financial behavior to help clients make better financial decisions is no longer a nice-to-have feature. Its becoming a competitive edge, if not a must-have.

Cost justified

Appointing a behavioral sciences team to work with leadership to shape culture and help advisors work more effectively with clients impacts the bottom line. Using the team in the hiring process and in the workplace sets the trust compass in the right direction.

Applying a behavioral data-gathering discovery places deep insight into the behavioral science teams hands. They can then respond to different demands across the business. From the behavior of the board to the frontline, they can advise and educate on how to understand and leverage (or attenuate) behaviors. Behavioral science teams look for and correct bias. Their work keeps the financial industry honest.

When financial advisors know how to use and apply behavioral insights, they develop stronger client rapport and can give tailored financial advice to clients. Ultimately, they can claim greater market share as they build a reputation of trust and integrity.

Think of that impact industry wide if behavioral science and discovery are applied to recruiting, assessing and managing people, truly tailoring advice, excluding any form of unconscious bias and making sure peoples inherent behaviors are accounted for.

To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit DNA Behavior

bad attitudes are contagious

Bad Attitudes Are Contagious

Workplace attitudes influence every person in the organization, from team colleagues to the leadership. Attitudes can control the workplace environment by impacting morale, productivity, and team effectiveness. Understanding and recognizing the behaviors that are at the root of poor attitudes is essential to the ongoing success and security of the business.

It only takes one person with an unchecked bad attitude to bring down an organization. The power of such an individual to cause destruction will stem from a variety of places: fear, anger, dissatisfaction, jealousy, or bad attitude. Whatever the trigger, the danger, if this behavior is left unchecked, can become a weapon of mass destruction to the business.

What part do you play in ensuring inappropriate behavior is challenged? If you hear or are part of an exchange that begins with.. “just between you and me,” or “I know you won’t tell anyone..”, it’s clear a confidence is about to be broken. So, what is your reaction?

Low-level gossipy stuff is every bit as important to identify and stamp out as is a wolf in sheep’s clothing. That one who presents as committed, loyal and trustworthy, but, under pressure, this surface learned behavior can turn lethal.

A person who intentionally sets about leaking classified information (for example), and not always for monetary gain, but simply because they have been passed over for promotion, or they have some ideological position that they think legitimizes them to leak information. These are the people that CEOs are crying out to identify to limit the damage.

A recent article in BuzzFeed News reports: Reality Leigh Winner, a 25-year-old Air Force veteran, was arrested on Saturday after the Department of Justice alleged that she printed out a classified document on her work computer and mailed it to The Intercept. Winner served in the Air Force for six years, where she worked as a linguist specializing in Arabic and Farsi. She had recently worked for a government contractor in Augusta, Georgia, where the NSA also has a facility.

Only time will tell as to her motivations, but the question to ask is this – could managers and supervisors have read any signs to alert them to a rogue in their midst? The answer is yes.

The 2016 Global Fraud Study by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) estimated that the typical organization loses 5% of revenues in each year because of fraud. The total loss caused by the cases in their study exceeded $6.3 billion, with an average loss per case of $2.7 million.

These statistics expose the need for robust and validated analytics to be the foundation for identifying/managing behaviors that can become a potential threat to business.

DNA Behavior‘s founder and CEO Hugh Massie has always advocated the importance of putting people before numbers. He believes that investing in understanding people, and getting below the surface of what is seen, to discover inherent behavior will, in the end, safeguard the numbers, while protecting the business.

Monitoring employees through the collection of Big Data can provide insights into social networking, relationships and even reveal normal behavior turning malevolent, but falls short. Readily available psychometric assessment tools bridge the gap. The Business DNA Natural Discovery Process identifies, who, when placed under pressure, is most likely to cause disruption to the business. Further, they reveal the environmental catalysts that provoke such behavior.

In the current theater of world politics, opinions are heightened. 80% of future lone wolves are known to take politics personally and claim that they have been wronged enough that action would be justified.

But creating rogue behavior does not necessarily require a change in government or some other significant change – the threat within can be a team member who cannot cope with pressure or are dissatisfied with the environment in which they work. It’s that simple. This kind of behavior can be revealed and managed.

The solution is the deployment of a validated personality discovery process, providing insights into hidden, hard-wired traits and a reliable prediction of where security or compliance risks exist. Based on external research, employees with the following measurable behavioral traits are more likely to engage in rogue behavior when emotionally triggered:

  1. Innovative – bright mind, which turns into curious and devious thinking
  2. Ambitious – desire for success, leading to cutting corners
  3. Secretive – working under cover and not revealing key information

When every member of a team knows, understands and is comfortable with each others behavior, it not only builds trust, but such effective teams give companies a significant competitive advantage. High-functioning teams would identify and weed out malevolent behavior instantly. They are alert to any sign of inappropriate behavior and challenge it.

Becoming a behaviorally smart organization is as simple as using a highly validated behavioral discovery process. Armed with the depth of insight such a discovery provides, management can dynamically match employees with specific environmental conditions to determine their potential response. They can also discern the degree to which such responses could create damaging behavior and negative actions towards the business.

Lastly, management can apply these insights towards talent re-allocation, employee evaluation, team development and improved hiring processes.

To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit DNA Behavior

What Contingent Liabilities are Your Employees Causing

What Contingent Liabilities are Your Employees Causing?

Rogue behavior costing $36 billion in legal bills since the financial crisis should give every Board member and Executive sleepless nights. Then add the cost to hire significant compliance and security management and staff to curb rogue behavior, and some serious questions need to be asked!

  1. What part does pressure to chase profitability encourage a greater level of risk to be taken?
  2. How much risk is the business willing to take? And at what level does risk become reckless?
  3. Is the level of inter-staff competitiveness so great that irresponsible risk is encouraged?
  4. How vigilant are those in leadership to the impact of pressure on employees?

Working in an environment pressurized to succeed at all costs, tends to be the norm, especially in the Financial Sector. Just look at Wells Fargo. Whilst taking risk is a legitimate part of building a successful business and keeping ahead of the competition, when pressure and risk collide it can quickly become a weapon in the wrong hands. Unable to balance risk under pressure to achieve results, the line becomes blurred between acceptable business practices and legal or moral improprieties.

Even more alarming, is when Boards and senior executives fail to acknowledge the environments that promote rogue behavior simply to increase profits. It could be argued that they are as culpable as the rogue employee. Daniel Kahneman, in his book Thinking Fast and Slow, says “we can be blind to the obvious, and we are also blind to our blindness.”

Prosecutions and regulatory enforcement stemming from noncompliance related to employee behavior such as corruption, bribery, rogue trading and insider trading are on the rise around the world. In fiscal 2015, the SEC filed nearly 7% more cases over the prior year, meting out $4.2 billion in sanctions.

People are hired for their talent but little attention is paid to their inherent personality. So when an individual is placed under significant pressure or pushed to take excessive risks, their behavior can turn rogue. The good news? When pressure and risk collide can now be predicted.

Using behavioral insights, management can dynamically match employees with specific environmental conditions to determine their potential response to risk and pressure. They can also discern the degree to which such responses could create rogue behavior and negative actions towards the business.

It is no longer enough to simply look at emails, computer keystrokes, outside influences, sick records etc. – the old hat of international espionage and anti-terrorist tools. What should be clearly understood is that the rogue employee is a human being, that when placed under significant pressure to achieve, will take risks.

The question to Boards and Executives is – do you know your employees?

What corporate entities have in their corner is direct and immediate access to their own personnel from top to bottom and every department – including even outside partners and vendors. So the solution is the deployment of a validated personality discovery process, providing hidden insights and a reliable prediction of where security or compliance risks exist.
Based on external research, employees with the following measurable behavioral traits are more likely to engage in rogue behavior when emotionally triggered

  1. An inventive mind, full of ground-breaking ideas turns their thoughts to curious and devious thinking when, as an example; many of their ideas are rejected.
  2. A go-getting, determined person, driven to success at any cost; begins to cut corners, as a toxic competitive streak takes over.
  3. A reticent, uncommunicative, taciturn minded person normally just seen as the quiet one’ begins to hold onto key information that others need, simply because they have taken offense over something trivial.
Which Employee is Your Molotov Cocktail2

DNA Behavior International’s validated system gets below the surface to reveal behaviors that, if not managed, can lead to ruinous behavior.
The Unique DNA Behavior Approach is able to Score, Filter, and Prioritize Employee Personality Insights.

oerational risk 3.1

Which Employee is Your Molotov Cocktail

Which Employee is Your Molotov Cocktail?

Potentially 5% of your workforce includes employees that are a high-security risk. The cost of all types of fraud is a staggering 5% of turnover, per the 2014 Global Fraud Study by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE.) So, what’s the cost of rogue employee behavior to your business? Simply identifying the personality type most likely to cross the line and the triggers that push them there could save you big dollars and your reputation. Or better yet, how do you help an employee to align their strengths to a given role and avoid rogue behavior altogether?

While larger businesses are investing more in cyber security and other monitoring programs, virtually nothing is being put towards identifying and monitoring costly employee behavior risks. The problem is that many of these insider threats are already in your business and the situation is gaining momentum without anyone being the wiser. The Global State of Information Security Survey 2015 recommends that 23% of the annual spend on business security should be directed to behavioral profiling and monitoring of employees.

Research shows that the following problems are caused by human behavior:

  • Combinations of human behavioral factor outliers and external environmental factors (e.g. financial difficulty) trigger emotions causing negative behavior toward the company.
  • Combinations of employees with too similar or too different styles working in a high-risk environment cause internal control issues.

Which Employee is Your Molotov Cocktail

The solution is the deployment of a validated personality discovery process, providing insights to hidden, hard-wired traits and a reliable prediction of where security or compliance risks exist. Based on external research, employees with the following measurable behavioral traits are more likely to engage in rogue behavior when emotionally triggered:

  1. Innovative – bright mind, which turns into curious and devious thinking
  2. Ambitious – desire for success, leading to cutting corners
  3. Secretive – working under cover and not revealing key information

The reality is that any person with a weak or temporarily broken character in the wrong team or facing external pressure can make flawed decisions and therefore, become the source of costly negative behavior. The employee behavior review using personality assessment methodologies should be uniformly applied to every employee in the business from the top down to distill the “hot spot” areas. The high performing leaders down through the sales and operations teams to the disgruntled bookkeeper are not exempt – New hires, or old guard, every last one. You only have to look at the recent headlines regarding Wells Fargo, Volkswagen, and JP Morgan. I am regularly seeing it in the financial services industry and the privately held businesses with whom we partner.

Which Employee is Your Molotov Cocktail2

Using behavioral insights, management can dynamically match employees with specific environmental conditions to determine their potential response. They can also discern the degree to which such responses could create rogue behavior and negative actions towards the business. Lastly, management can apply these insights towards talent re-allocation, employee evaluation, team development and improved hiring processes.