Posts

5 Keys to Behaviorally Smart Hiring: Don’t rely solely on resumes, concentrate on who the person is

Great resumes can be bought. Behaviors can’t be.

The only way to effectively hire and retain candidates is to ensure you not only fit the right skills to the right job but that you also find the right cultural and behavioral style fit for the role and team.

Validating behavioral intelligence will deepen engagement in each human interaction the candidate will have in the business as part of their performance. A person’s skills will be a moot point if he or she can’t effectively interact with the team and/or customers or if the person is a social butterfly when a task-oriented person is needed.? The process of exploring and validating behavioral intelligence should also uncover life and business decision-making patterns as this could determine whether or not a candidate will be a long-term, loyal, and successful hire.

Happy Candidate in the Right Role

Key 1: Alignment of vision and life direction; engaging head, heart, and talent

Ask questions to discover if the vision and direction the candidate has for his or her life aligns with the vision and direction of the organization. Another important question to investigate is whether the organization can deliver its part to bring a successful outworking of the candidate’s vision and life direction? If the answer is yes, then not only will it be a great hire, but likely a long-term relationship. An individual is less likely to consider leaving when he or she is a part of working towards a shared key goal or milestone.

Key 2: Uncover life and decision making patterns

Understanding how to communicate effectively is the most valuable route to uncovering behaviors, decision making patterns and strengthening engagement. Knowing the communication style of each candidate prior to the hiring interview will enable the interviewing panel to customize their questions to the individual’s communication style.

To be able to effectively uncover life and decision making patterns, it’s important to understand how to communicate and the right questions to ask.Gaining insight into the communication and behavioral style of a candidate will reveal how well the individual/ he or she will fit with colleagues and respond to managers and supervisors.

Key 3: Match behaviors as well as talents to the role–having the skills to do the job isn’t enough

It is best to keep in mind, however, that having the skills to do the job isn’t enough. People want to work with meaning. Jobseekers will apply for positions they feel match their skills, but often the hiring process fails to match both talents and behaviors to the job. Whilst organizations need to secure the talent necessary for the success of the business, matching behaviors, as well as talents to roles, builds foundational blocks for long-term success.

Key 4: Don’t hire yourself

The trap many hiring panels fall into is assuming that a great exchange between candidate and hiring panel translates to best role fit. To avoid this pitfall, the interview panel needs to understand their own individual and collective behavior, communication and decision-making style in advance. This awareness will enable the panel to adapt their communication and interviewing style to the candidates. It is natural to feel more comfortable with communication that mirrors one’s own style. Conversely, it’s also the case that there could be an adverse response to communication styles that do not align.

Key 5: Be known as a champion organization; one that has candidates lining up to get in. Everyone wants to work for a winner.

Be Known as a Champion Organization

Understand and implement each of these 5 keys, and you are more likely to hire effectively and retain top talent. People want to work for an organization that values talent, communicates effectively, and is known not only for its success in business but its inherent ability to know, understand and engage with employees to get the very best out of them/unlock their potential. Having a reputation as an organization that delivers their employees vision, in addition to delivering the vision of the business, will attract top talent.

Key 1: Alignment of vision and life direction; engaging head, heart, and talent.

Key 2: Uncover life and decision making patterns.

Key 3: Match behaviors as well as talents to the role; having the skills to do the job isn’t enough.

Key 4: Don’t hire yourself

Key 5: Be known as a champion organization; one that has candidates lining up to get in. Everyone wants to for a winner.

There’s no such thing as the perfect candidate. Look for candidates who can perform at the job with a bit of training and practice but have a communication and behavioral style that’s the best fit for your current team dynamics.

Remember: Great resumes can be bought. Behaviors cannot be.

Management Principle: Enthusiasm

People are truly the most cherished resource a company can have, regardless of what corporate officers say or do. And, because many organizational leaders focus on outcomes and not process, they try to achieve an end, but fail to address the systems and processes that create success. Supplying the emotional needs of your employees is essential for both human and corporate health.

Enthusiasm. We all want our employees to be enthusiastic because it’s reflective of a level of engagement. This inward motivation supplies emotional energy and thus physical energy to get the job done. The question is: Where does enthusiasm come from? How can we hire people who are enthusiastic? And, what do we do with people who have lost their enthusiasm? The answer lies in humanity and not in financial incentives. Humans are complex beings comprised of physical, mental, emotional, and social aspects that require care, nurture, and encouragement. Enthusiasm is something that is felt and is usually the result of inspiration. It emerges when a person sees their part in a bigger story; it counteracts the voices that say “you are insignificant.” To develop enthusiasm, leaders must be visionaries while demonstrating strong managerial prowess–true efficacy in leadership requires both. They articulate the big picture and then help their people live in that vision through inspiration and modeling. While this makes intellectual sense, it’s not intuitive, which is why leadership is a profession of discipline, and not simply a position one occupies.

Coaching questions: Is your life a form of inspiration to others? How can you create more enthusiastic employees?

Read more coaching principles from Dean Harbry on the Internal Innovations website.