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Measure Behavior for Better Hires

Measure Behavior for Better Hires

Whether your organization is up and running or you are an entrepreneur facing your first hire, you may have valid questions around the hiring process. Is this the right time to hire? Do I have a recruitment process that fosters ongoing employee engagement? And if you really want to be poised for hiring success, youll hopefully include behavioral insights in your hiring equation:

  • Have I benchmarked the typical behavioral characteristics needed for specific roles?
  • Am I clear about the talents and the behaviors I expect from the hire?
  • Do I have quality behavioral questions to use during interview?

The cost of making the wrong hire is clear. One study cites 69 percent of employers in 2012 reported that a bad hiring decision placed a strain on their company. Twenty-four percent of companies reported that a bad hiring decision cost them well over $50,000, with a larger 41 percent of businesses reporting a figure of over $25,000. Other findings put the figure at over $40,000 to replace an executive employee, and anything from $7,000 to $10,000 to replace an entry- to mid-level employee. According to Entrepreneur magazine, citing a Robert Half survey of financial professionals, in 95 percent of cases a bad hiring decision can affect office morale. Likewise, Gallup estimates that there are 22 million actively disengaged employees costing the economy as much as $350 billion per year in lost productivity. These costs are in addition to the cost of replacing a bad hire. When you know 87 percent of business issues are people-related, its not hard to see how important the hiring process is. According to a Deloitte Insights article from 2015, culture and engagement is the most important issue companies face around the world. Consequently, the hiring process must include:

  • Benchmarks of inherent natural behavioral talents and communication styles.
  • Benchmarks of talents required for different roles to the candidates talents
  • Benchmarks of the typical behavioral characteristics needed for high performance in specific roles, so the right people can be hired for that role.

This insight would not only deliver the right people for the job, but also enable more effective matching of individuals to teams and line managers. This same sort of matching also can provide value by aligning customers with your organizations representative(s) who can best serve them. Too often, people are employed for their skills and knowledge, with little or no attention paid to identifying a candidates true talents – those natural behaviors which continually and predictably repeat over time and are often not easily seen in an interview. When a highly-validated discovery tool is introduced into the hiring process, it not only reveals talents, behaviors and communication styles – all of which are measurable,it also reveals how the individual will respond under pressure. This insight allows the interview process to include specific behavioral questions that drill down to a candidates masked behavior, which likely only surfaces under the weight of a busy workload or, worse, in conflict with colleagues. Without a behavioral discovery process, over time and with pressure, the natural behavior emerges, and the candidate may not perform as hoped. Anyone involved in the hiring process also has blind spots and biases that likely form part of any failure to uncover the natural behaviors of the interviewees. Having a strong hiring process supported with robust discovery processes and strong behaviorally based interview questions will flag warning signs around an otherwise talented candidate. It could be that their moral compass when tested is lacking. It might be that under pressure or in a season of fast change to the organization they get left behind and this opens the potential for them to go rogue. Smart employers will know the value of having this information up front.

To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email?inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit?DNA Behavior.

Pioneer

How Not to be Named and Shamed in the #metoo Movement

This article first appeared on HR Management.

As leaders, we have a responsibility to understand the impact our behaviour has on the people we have the responsibility (and the privilege) of leading.

No longer is it acceptable to bully, manipulate, harass, individuals just to achieve our goals. No longer is it acceptable to take risks that compromise the business and alarm and unsettle staff. No more can position, authority or power be used to compromise a colleague.

Leaders need to have significant insight into their leadership style, their communication approach, their bias, and yes, we all have biases. Further, successful organizations invest in knowing its leaders and individual employees are attuned to these things.

Aggressive and controlling management styles are no longer acceptable. The greatest and most effective leaders know how to guide, mentor, and invest in their people, knowing that this sets individuals and teams up for success.

Leadership is complex; it takes character and self-awareness. It requires a level of vulnerability and re-thinking if leaders are to be effective. Allowing bottom-line results, aggressive deadlines and demanding stakeholders to style your approach to leadership is a recipe for disaster.

The leader who is behaviourally smart is the winner. When you understand the importance of getting below the surface of yourself and the people you lead and understand how best to invest into them, businesses flourish.

Inherent behaviour is fixed: Its who a person is; its the foundation. Its the raw material that informs how the world is viewed. It cant be learned. It drives talents and personality. It is fundamental hardwiring.

Personality is driven by behaviour: Its the mask worn; its a persons outward character. Its what we let others see on the surface. Personality is formed and revealed from circumstances, social pressure, education, social environment and family influences. Its the sum of the physical, mental, emotional and social characteristics of an individual and can change as circumstances dictate.

Having a revelation about the difference between inherent behaviour and personality not only educates, but, more importantly, it paves the way for leaders in business to understand what their role is in revealing behaviours which will remain constant over time. It gives insight and understanding into knowing when they are viewing the mask. Behaviour is the real person. Personality is the outward appearance an individual chooses to reveal.

Uncover this knowledge about yourself and you will quickly understand the importance of knowing it about the teams you lead.

The responsibility for effective team functioning and dynamics lies with you, the leader, and as such, demands a level of self-awareness that ensures your legacy will not be crossing boundaries and becoming named and shamed in the #metoo movement.

Using a highly-validated discovery process can deliver insight into both inherent and learned behaviour all of which is measurable.

It can reveal communication styles. This above all creates powerful leadership and team development. With this kind of insight, messages are appropriate and clear. Individuals understand what they are being asked to do and why. Great communication insight is especially crucial in times of pressure, when blunt exchanges can surface.

Examples of key communication insights that are powerful both for leadership and the team are shown in the quadrant graphic. There is powerful value in leadership learning how to connect with each style and stay connected and then use this knowledge and insight to build optimally functioning teams.

Learn what lurks beneath, and use it to your advantage.

Blog image

To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit DNA Behavior.

rogue

Preventing Rogue Employees Circumventing the Board

Corporate boards can drive process to minimize rogue employees

Does your business have the governance structure in place to deal with a rogue employee? If you havent, then dealing with the fallout and getting the organization back on track and refocused on business will be slow and painful.

No longer is the outlier employee just the one kicking against management, stealing corporate intellectual property or actual property. Its the one destroying the company reputation on social media. Its the one sitting at home and trashing individual executives reputation using inappropriate language. Its the one setting up unauthorized and potentially damaging hashtags.

Those people responsible for the oversight of governance in your organization must be across every area where rogue employees can find a destructive playground.

Generally, its the board that has overall responsibility for oversight of the company being governed. Therefore, its important to make sure board members are empowered to take such responsibility and that they have the credibility to so. The board structure itself is important for achieving the goal.

Further, the information flows cannot be blocked by the CEO and executive team as that itself is a problem. The board needs to know whats going on; in fact, they have an obligation to know.

Once the structure is there, find out where the board members draw the proverbial line in the sand in terms of behavior, both in the workplace and in their personal life. Establish their ability to identify potential fires in the business and understand if they have the skills to extinguish them. Ensure they ask the right questions of business executives.

Experienced board members intuitively know when information is being withheld or massaged. Still, there should be checks and balances so that heading off your company’s next potential crisis is not left solely to intuition.

The more the board members understand the strengths and behaviors they bring to their own roles, the better able they will be to ensure there is a robust strategy in place to handle rogue behavior.

You see, potentially 5 percent of your workforce includes employees that are a high-security risk. The cost of all types of fraud is a staggering 5 percent of turnover, per the 2014 Global Fraud Study by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE.) So, what’s the cost of rogue employee behavior to your business?

Simply identifying the personality type most likely to cross the line and the triggers that push them there could save you big dollars and your reputation. Or better yet, how do you help an employee to align their strengths to a given role and avoid rogue behavior altogether?

While larger businesses are investing more in cyber security and other monitoring programs, virtually nothing is being put toward identifying and monitoring costly employee behavior risks. The problem is that many of these insider threats are already in your business and the situation is gaining momentum without anyone being the wiser. The Global State of Information Security Survey 2015 recommends that 23 percent of the annual spend on business security should be directed to behavioral profiling and monitoring of employees.

Research also shows these problems are caused by human behavior:

  • Combinations of human behavioral factor outliers and external environmental factors (e.g. financial difficulty) trigger emotions causing negative behavior toward the company.
  • Combinations of employees with too similar or too different styles working in a high-risk environment cause internal control issues.

A key part of the solution could be the deployment of a validated personality discovery process, providing insights to hidden, hard-wired traits and a reliable prediction of where security or compliance risks exist.

Based on external research, employees with certain measurable behavioral traits are more likely to engage in rogue behavior when emotionally triggered:

  1. Innovative -bright mind, which turns into curious and devious thinking.
  2. Ambitious – desire for success, leading to cutting corners.
  3. Secretive – working under cover and not revealing key information.

The reality is that any person with a weak or temporarily broken character in the wrong team or facing external pressure can make flawed decisions, thus becoming the source of costly negative behavior. The employee behavior review using personality assessment should be uniformly applied to every employee in the business from the top down in order to distill the hot spot areas.

No one should be exempt from these assessments, whether they are new hires or part of the old guard. Include high-performing leaders down through the sales and operations teams to the disgruntled bookkeeper and, yes, board members.

Using behavioral insights, management can dynamically match employees with specific environmental conditions to determine their potential response. They can also discern the degree to which such responses could create rogue behavior and negative actions toward the business. Management can even apply these insights toward talent re-allocation, employee evaluation, team development and improved hiring.

Understanding behaviors and inter-relationships is not a soft area, unworthy of investment. On the contrary, it could be the key to delivering high-quality governance in any organization. Behavioral insights paired with oversight processes and procedures can and will deliver ongoing performance minimizes or eliminates breeding grounds for rogue behavior.

To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit DNA Behavior

lead generation practices

Who’s In Charge? Leading Corporate Culture

It’s the behavior of the leaders that shapes the culture of an organization. Do you agree?

As leaders, we make a conscious decision to lead well. But how successful are we if we don’t understand the impact of our own behavior on the culture of the organization. As leaders, we are always under the microscope of our employees; they mimic our behavior, adopt our values, and quote us. As for our customers, if what they see are inappropriate values that may determine whether or not to do business with. How can we ensure we are giving out the right message and that how we’re represented to our customers is good for the organization? Our behavior, and how it’s mirrored by others, impacts our organization’s bottom line. So it’s up to us whether our personal impact is positive or negative.

Just this week I have seen examples of both positive and negative behavior which highlights the need for leadership to understand that setting a cultural standard can showcase the business well.

It’s interesting that the two most emotionally charged environments for customers are flying and finances and yet much needs to be done to improve the cultures of these two industries regarding the behaviors they demonstrate when serving their customers.

Having just completed a 14-hour flight and needing to change currency in a bank I feel able to make some comment on the service I personally received.

Leg one of my flight had me more involved in watching the personal conversations/gossiping going on between the cabin crew when I was trying to get their attention for some water. To the crew, passengers seemed to be a distraction, at best, and a nuisance, at worst, to their conversation. It would not be difficult to determine that this level of poor customer service comes from the top.

The second leg of my flight was entirely different, the passengers were king, and the staff was attentive. They were gracious and professional, able to accommodate different conversations amongst all age groups and cultures. Clearly, standards set by leadership.

Next came the bank, long queues, no explanations, shortage of staff, and teller didn’t even look at me. Interestingly, I saw other tellers behaving in the same way. Again, this kind of behavior is mirrored from leadership. Sadly, I’ve experienced this the world over.

However, the second bank welcomed me at the door, and based on my need, directed me to a teller. I was greeted with a smile and made to feel that my $500 money exchange was the largest financial transaction the bank would undertake that day. Clearly, an example of leadership that teaches appreciation for each and every customer interaction.

When leaders set the vision and cultural direction through the lens of the customer, and they examine why people behave the way they do, they can then set vision and culture that responds to the needs of the customer.

It isn’t enough to know that people are nervous about flying or that they are concerned about having enough money for their journey. Airline staff and Financial organizations need to understand not only how to build a trusting relationship with their customers, but also to examine themselves to understand how they will react to the anxious passenger or fearful investor.

Great leaders know the importance of understanding their own leadership personality. By using a validated profiling system such as the DNA Behavior Natural Discovery Process, they can see in great depth their inherent behavior. This insight is foundational to self-awareness from which setting values and culture stem. Successful leaders set a vibrant culture that engages and energizes employees. They clearly define what culture means to them and walks it out both personally and professionally.

A culture audit will quickly identify how set values are being interpreted. For example, lack of resources can trigger behavior that directly impacts culture. Lack of training is a further trigger. But if culture criteria and standards are not set and known throughout the business it cannot be audited.

Michael Hiltzik, writing for the LA Times, makes this observation: The airline and banking industries may seem to be about as different as chalk and cheese, but Airlines and Wells Fargo have been shown to share a common bond: toxic corporate cultures that can be blamed on the men at the top, their chief executives.

Investopedia suggests the following meaning of corporate culture: Corporate culture refers to the beliefs and behaviors that determine how a company’s employees and management interact and handle business transactions. Often, corporate culture is implied, not expressly defined, and develops organically over time from the cumulative traits of the people the company hires.

Prof. James L. Heskett wrote in his book The Culture Cycle, effective culture can account for 20-30% of the differential in corporate performance when compared with culturally unremarkable competitors.

Culture is learned behavior, but its growth comes from a place of self-knowledge. If leadership and individuals know their own personality, they can quickly identify how well they can adapt to cultural standards.

So, what’s the lesson to be learned? Culture is set at the top of the organization. Leaders need to uncover their values as an important first step to establishing the culture of their organizations. This approach, using DNA Natural Discovery helps define the framework within which culture is set, decision making styles are formulated and goals achieved. It becomes especially important when leadership has different, even conflicting values. Admittedly defining your values is often hard to do, but when done truthfully and openly upfront at the leadership level, culture becomes much easier to set, communicate and carry out.

To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit DNA Behavior.

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES FIRM CONTINUES GROWTH

Behavioral Sciences Firm Continues Growth

ATLANTA, June 7, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Atlanta-based DNA Behavior International continues its growth and evolution with a member of the executive team taking on a new role. Leon Morales, who since 2013 has served as DNA Behavior’s Chief Relationship Officer, is now Managing Director.

Leon Morales

“Leon has a deep history with behavioral science tools, as well as being a seasoned leader with experience across finance, technology, operations, accounting and organizational change,” says Hugh Massie, CEO of DNA Behavior and a pioneer in the practical application of behavioral insights. “Recalibrating which of our team members handles various organizational roles is a prime example of DNA behavioral data and technology in action and enables us to be even more effective and efficient in helping our clients unlock the power of behavioral insights.”

DNA Behavior (www.dnabehavior.com) it is a behavioral sciences company employing data and technology solutions to enable individuals and organizations to discover and leverage strengths. It delivers practical and scalable behavioral intelligence solutions to “know, engage and grow” every client and employee online, working with financial services and contact centers, in the insurance industry and operations executives in medium to large companies.

“I’m excited to take on this new challenge, including helping other team members finesse their roles to maximize our work together and on behalf of clients,” Morales says. “This re-alignment also further enables Hugh to focus on his roles growing strategic relationships and as a behavioral science expert, while our team minds the proverbial store.”

Prior to DNA Behavior, Morales was a Senior Workplace Behavioral Consultant with Aret Global Consulting, following several years as Principal of Business Development for Innovar Partners and, later, Innovar Collective. He spent 16 years with Cox Communications in a number of leadership roles. As an entrepreneur, Morales founded an accounting firm and, later, a new media forum. He began his career as a certified public accountant.

Morales served in the United States Air Force, holds a BBA in Accounting from the University of Texas at Arlington and is trained in the Birkman Method. For those who know DNA Behavior-speak, Morales is an Initiator.

DNA Behavior says its behavioral sciences data and tech tools have solved communication, goal-setting and investing challenges in over 123 countries through 11 languages and 12 proprietary DNA Behavior Discovery Processes.

Media inquiries:
B. Andrew (Drew) Plant
196797@email4pr.com
404-634-7102

SOURCE DNA Behavior International

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http://www.dnabehavior.com

Concept: Successful business trend. Happy talented businesswoman

Own it! And Succeed

The more we understand our own personality and behavioral responses, the better able we are, both as individuals and teams, to work together effectively and avoid the blame game when things go wrong.

In his recent article, The Blame Game, Marc Corsini observes, When salespeople, professionals or executives are underperforming, they usually complain about others first.

We all have our strengths and struggles. But those who understand and take responsibility for their behavior, will gain respect from others and have a healthy respect for themselves. Accepting personal responsibility is one of the most important factors in defining a person’s true character.

There is something liberating about being behaviorally aware. DNA Behavior’s Natural Behavior Discovery process offers significant insights into our “go to” behavior – our default reaction when under pressure, or when we make a mistake or lose focus among life events.

Sometimes, when we’re struggling or lose confidence, rather than asking for help, we blame others for our lack of performance or our mistakes. On occasion, we are the ones being blamed and fail to stand up to the accuser. But the reality is that such a response is immature. We need to take responsibility for our own behaviors and responses. Becoming behaviorally smart is as simple as completing a highly-validated psychometric questionnaire and receiving detailed personality insight, together with detailed information on how to build on our strengths and manage our struggles.

Further, becoming behaviorally smart through completing the DNA Behavior Natural Discovery process will also reveal other areas where it is important to take responsibility for our behavior. For example:

  1. How we lead others.
  2. How we communicate and wish to be communicated with.
  3. The environment within which we are more likely to flourish.
  4. How we perform on a consistent basis
  5. Our reaction to the financial markets when they fluctuate.
  6. How we approach decision making.
  7. How willing we are to take risk or not.
  8. Our biases (we all have them, but the key is knowing what they are and how to manage them).

In leadership, it’s likely that people will work more effectively if leaders understand them. Sounds simple! But without insight into personality, communication, strengths, and struggles, leaders can’t be successful.

When a leader is self-aware and has gained insights into how to manage others through understanding and managing behavior – success is the outcome.

To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit DNA Behavior