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Bridge the Relationship Gap to Engage Clients

More and more evidence is emerging suggesting Gen D (digital generation) represent an interesting developing market for financial services firms. Gen D are attracted by social media, they expect it to be evidenced in all areas of their life. Importantly they will look for this approach from their advisors who in turn must understand the importance of building trust with Gen D through the use of social media.

Interestingly, Gen D is not necessarily age related rather media savvy related. Good communication today doesnt involve changing the what of the message, but the how. Clients who fall into the Gen D bracket want to know you are on social media. Thats where they will look for you. Thats where building trust begins and where the voice of the customer is becoming the loudest. It falls to advisors to understand the importance not only of social media but how best to engage with a wide age range of potential clients through gaining behavioral awareness.

Having recently read an interesting article from Accenture following a survey they conducted into how Gen D investors approach wealth management its clear that the financial industry must change their approach to the use of social media if they are to attract, build trust with and maintain long term relationships with Gen D.? Click here to read the full article from Accenture.

Visit the Financial DNA website to learn more about building trust with clients and bridge the relationship gap.

Its All About Trust

The only valid purpose of a firm is to create a customer.

Wise words written by management guru Peter Drucker in his 1973 masterpiece, Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices.

Now fast forward to 2013 and the financial services industry.? What are customers looking for when choosing a financial advisor?

Trustworthiness.

According to a new study released by the CFA Institute/Edelman Investor Trust Study, clients consider trustworthiness more important than investment management skills when choosing a financial advisor. 35% of respondents said whether an advisor was trusted to act in my best interest was the most important factor when hiring an advisor. The ability to achieve high returns was cited half as often, at 17%, and the advisors fee structure was important to just seven percent of respondents.

This is yet another example to support the fact that 93.6% of financial planning is behavioral management of the client.

A behaviorally smart advisor knows how to build trust from the very first interaction with the customer.

The research offered three behavior related attributes to building trust:

  1. Create transparent and open business practices. What tool do you have in place to objectively understand the clients financial personality, including their natural level of trust?? Using a discovery system helps formulate the basis for deep, meaningful conversations tailored to the unique characteristics of the customer. You will eliminate the guess- work and assumptions. And, as an advisor, you should share your financial personality and level of trust with the customer.? Thats transparency!
  2. Take responsible actions to address an issue or crisis. The real behavioral approach is to find out what responsible actions means to each unique customer.? A research -laden email explaining the markets may suffice for some.? Others may need a phone call to allow them to express emotions along with some high level facts.? You need to discover this information up front with a customer before the crisis occurs.? Knowing exactly how the customer operates under stress is crucial to the longevity of your relationship.
  3. Have ethical business practices. Whether you agree or not, the financial services industry is still suffering from the 2008 financial crisis.? The bailouts and lack of punishment for those responsible still leaves a shadow of doubt in the general populations mind on how far they can trust financial institutions.? If you adopt an understanding people before numbers approach and have an objective system for uncovering all the risks of the customer relationship (financial, investment and personality), chances are you will be viewed as a trusted advisor.

Isnt it time to become a behaviorally smart advisor?? Your customers are counting on it!? Simple, actionable solutions are waiting for you at the Financial DNA website.

Its All About Trust

The only valid purpose of a firm is to create a customer.

Wise words written by management guru Peter Drucker in his 1973 masterpiece, Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices.

Now fast forward to 2013 and the financial services industry. What are customers looking for when choosing a financial advisor?

Trustworthiness.

According to a new study released by the CFA Institute/Edelman Investor Trust Study, clients consider trustworthiness more important than investment management skills when choosing a financial advisor. 35% of respondents said whether an advisor was trusted to act in my best interest was the most important factor when hiring an advisor. The ability to achieve high returns was cited half as often, at 17%, and the advisors fee structure was important to just seven percent of respondents.

This is yet another example to support the fact that 93.6% of financial planning is behavioral management of the client.

A behaviorally smart advisor knows how to build trust from the very first interaction with the customer.

The research offered three behavior related attributes to building trust:

1) Create transparent and open business practices.

What tool do you have in place to objectively understand the clients financial personality, including their natural level of trust? Using a discovery system helps formulate the basis for deep, meaningful conversations tailored to the unique characteristics of the customer. You will eliminate the guess- work and assumptions. And, as an advisor, you should share your financial personality and level of trust with the customer. Thats transparency!

2) Take responsible actions to address an issue or crisis.

The real behavioral approach is to find out what responsible actions means to each unique customer. A research -laden email explaining the markets may suffice for some. Others may need a phone call to allow them to express emotions along with some high level facts. You need to discover this information up front with a customer before the crisis occurs. Knowing exactly how the customer operates under stress is crucial to the longevity of your relationship.

3) Have ethical business practices.

Whether you agree or not, the financial services industry is still suffering from the 2008 financial crisis. The bailouts and lack of punishment for those responsible still leaves a shadow of doubt in the general populations mind on how far they can trust financial institutions. If you adopt an understanding people before numbers approach and have an objective system for uncovering all the risks of the customer relationship (financial, investment and personality), chances are you will be viewed as a trusted advisor.

Isnt it time to become a behaviorally smart advisor? Your customers are counting on it! Simple, actionable solutions are waiting for you at: www.financialdna.com.

Its All About Trust

The only valid purpose of a firm is to create a customer.

Wise words written by management guru Peter Drucker in his 1973 masterpiece, Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices.

Now fast forward to 2013 and the financial services industry.? What are customers looking for when choosing a financial advisor?

Trustworthiness.

According to a new study released by the CFA Institute/Edelman Investor Trust Study, clients consider trustworthiness more important than investment management skills when choosing a financial advisor. 35% of respondents said whether an advisor was trusted to act in my best interest was the most important factor when hiring an advisor. The ability to achieve high returns was cited half as often, at 17%, and the advisors fee structure was important to just seven percent of respondents.

This is yet another example to support the fact that 93.6% of financial planning is behavioral management of the client.

A behaviorally smart advisor knows how to build trust from the very first interaction with the customer.

The research offered three behavior related attributes to building trust:

1)??? Create transparent and open business practices.

What tool do you have in place to objectively understand the clients financial personality, including their natural level of trust?? Using a discovery system helps formulate the basis for deep, meaningful conversations tailored to the unique characteristics of the customer. You will eliminate the guess- work and assumptions. And, as an advisor, you should share your financial personality and level of trust with the customer.? Thats transparency!

2)??? Take responsible actions to address an issue or crisis.

The real behavioral approach is to find out what responsible actions means to each unique customer.? A research -laden email explaining the markets may suffice for some.? Others may need a phone call to allow them to express emotions along with some high level facts.? You need to discover this information up front with a customer before the crisis occurs.? Knowing exactly how the customer operates under stress is crucial to the longevity of your relationship.

3)??? Have ethical business practices.

Whether you agree or not, the financial services industry is still suffering from the 2008 financial crisis.? The bailouts and lack of punishment for those responsible still leaves a shadow of doubt in the general populations mind on how far they can trust financial institutions.? If you adopt an understanding people before numbers approach and have an objective system for uncovering all the risks of the customer relationship (financial, investment and personality), chances are you will be viewed as a trusted advisor.

Isnt it time to become a behaviorally smart advisor?? Your customers are counting on it!? Simple, actionable solutions are waiting for you at: www.financialdna.com.

Keys to Developing a Client-Centric Approach

If you don’t decide strongly for yourself the favorable outcome you want out of a client/advisor relationship, your success as an advisor will likely come from others’ definition of success.

In most cases those who ask for financial advice already know the answer. Often this is based on their instinct and seeking professional advice delivers not only a confirmation but probably a measure of confidence in terms of trusting their instincts.

The measure of a strong advisor client relationship lies not in the confirmation of things already known but whether or not the advisor has the skills to take the relationship to the next level.

Financial Planning, Financial Personality, Quality Life Planning, Perpetual Income

A primary responsibility of an advisor is to gain an understanding of where the client is going before deciding how to get them there. This level of connection begins the process of taking the relationship to the next level.

Investing time into understanding the journey clients are on can only be achieved if the advisor firstly understands how to communicate effectively with them. Communication is the key that unlocks closed relationships and makes a pathway for questions to be asked in a way that causes no offence and yet elicits answers that go to the heart of how a client wants to use their money.

  • what their drivers are
  • the plans they have for their lives and those of their family
  • their tolerance to risk

Perhaps more importantly such an approach opens the door to insights that inevitably allow the advisor opportunities to upsell in a non-threatening way.

Todays economic landscape is constantly evolving and as a result people are far more cautious about the advice they listen to. Clients are likely to seek advice from many sources but are far more likely to return to those whose advice is based on understanding their journey and knowing how to communicate effectively with them. This is the relationship that not only delivers success for the advisor but peace of mind for the client. A win win.

Visit the Financial DNA website to learn more about how you can develop a client-centric approach.