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Wealth Mentoring Your Clients….Managing Behavior

Hang on. Where is the market going to? Will the Dow be 5000 in the next few months by June 2009 or 22000 in 6 years? Who knows. They are interesting questions. I have placed my own personal wager on the markets reaching these levels in those time frames with some friends. I have often talked about this with friends and clients since 1999. Japan could still get messy for the world yet as it has many unresolved issues. These problems coming down the pipeline have been a big part of my move into the human behavior business.

However, this whole discussion does call into question what is our role in advising clients? Is our role to help them manage their behavior or to get the highest maximum performance?

I have always said that financial planning risks are the sum of human behavioral risks (client and advisor) and market risks. Our whole Financial DNA program for investors and advisors has been predicated on this. Whilst the market itself cannot be managed by a client their reaction to it can be which comes back to human behavior management. There is university research which shows that 5% of a person’s wealth comes from their investments and 95% from their behavior.

I do believe 75% or more of our role is to save clients from themselves by helping manage their behavior. This involves educating, guiding, coaching and empowering them. What we call “Wealth Mentoring”. By adopting this approach you will be helping your clients obtain superior returns which far out weigh any level of fees that you can charge. The reality is that the key to successful investment is managing behavior.

Wealth Mentoring Transforms the Client Experience and Enhances Value

For the Wealth Mentoring approach to be successful the advisor must transform the client experience they provide. The client needs to experience the feeling that their life is more than money, their money has been humanized, a sense of improved relationships, discovery of life purpose and meaning, and finally a tailored portfolio built from the inside out. Then there must be an ongoing development experience involving wise counsel with the client knowing they have an improved quality life. Understanding their behavioral style and preferences is fundamental to all of this. Behavior shapes life decisions which in turn influence financial decisions. The linkage is very close.

Importantly, the value proposition to the client needs to be communicated. There are many tangible and intangible benefits of this approach. Research shows average mutual fund investors will over a 20 year period do themselves out of nearly 60% of the return produced by the average equity mutual fund. This means the average investor will significantly underperform the market and his own investments. So, if the average mutual fund return over the last 20 years is 10.81% and the average equity fund investor has averaged 4.48% then there is a 6.33% difference which represents the cost of not having a good planner. Hence a financial planner charging fees of 1% per annum and/or a retainer is very good value.

What is great is that now we have turbulent times lots of other leading commentators are coming out of the woodwork and giving this message loud and clear. We are at the start of a cultural revolution in the role of advisors in financial planning and the investors attitude to it. A revolution that is client centered and one from which everyone who plays the right game of managing behavior will be big winners. The philosophy of Understanding People before Numbers is here to stay.

The Advisors Value Proposition of a Wealth Mentoring Approach

Our last Whitepaper summarizes research that we have recently performed of 100 advisors with AUM over $50m. The conclusion is that far more client discovery could be performed and there is plenty of scope to introduce more fee based services which address the life of the client.

In my view what is ever good for the client will generally be good for the advisor in the long run. Lets look at why a behavioral “wealth mentoring” approach is good for the advisor’s bottom line let alone the credibility of their financial planning process and business.

The ROI for an advisor of adopting a systemized behavioral approach is driven by the ability to aid advisors in:

1. increasing client acquisition rates
2. increasing walletshare among existing clients
3. providing the justification for higher advice fees
4. increasing client retention rates
5. improving advisor productivity
6. increasing the business value.

Advisors who integrate a behavioral system into their practices find that they achieve these ROI goals by:

1. Establishing trust more rapidly with prospective clients through anticipating their communication, investment, and lifestyle needs

2. Gathering more assets from existing clients by positioning themselves as the client’s trusted advisor. Wealth mentoring facilitates client interactions that go well beyond investments and provides the basis for a deeper relationship with each client.

3. Supporting higher planning and advice fees through the offer of a powerful discovery process. Financial advisors may also use client centered systems to add new revenue generating services such as couple or family facilitation, executive life balance programs etc.

4. Improving relationships with problem clients. Advisors often struggle with a segment of their clients because their natural behaviors differ greatly with those of the advisor. While advisors may keep these relationships in good times, rocky markets require more careful facilitation to help clients feel understood.

5. Advisor productivity increases because once you know the behavior of the client it is easier and quicker to identify their needs, manage them and keep them committed to a plan. Alot of time can get burned for an advisor dealing with client changes and problems after year 1 which could have been addressed up-front.

6. Greater documentation of who the client is enables relationships to be transferred to other people within the practice and also when it is sold. This has a very positive impact on business value.

In terms of metrics, here is what we base the wealth mentoring value proposition on:

1. We have seen trends that advisors who adopt a client centred methodology are increasing their gross asset under management revenues by 25% or more per annum from new clients. Further, we are seeing them increase their fee for service revenues by 15% or more per annum. Also, there is enhanced client retention. Of course success from using any system is also up to the effort of the advisor.

We believe it is possible in respect of an average practice to help the principal advisor double their net take home profit over a 4 year period. This is achieved from segmenting the client base so it is fundamentally more productive and building the AUM and fee for service revenues from the top 100 or so clients. This is a substantial return on investment from our costs and the coaching cost.

2. From point 1, there is the ongoing business benefit that the increased revenues and profits translate to increased business value on sale. What we have also seen is that the behavioral data enables greater transferability of clients which is fundamental to the business value as revenue and profit sustainability post the sale are fundamental to the value.

The Impact of Money on Your Family

What has been the impact of money on your family? This is a big question and one often addressed in a family meeting. Also, it is often asked by your financial advisor in the financial planning discussion.

There will be both positive and negative impacts of money on a family. In many ways these impacts will shape who the family is, determine the family relationships, define the family legacy and how the family is remembered by others. So, the impact of money is very significant.

Importantly, the impacts of money on the family will also shape each family member’s relationship to money. Your relationship to money will then have a large bearing on your relationship with the family.

Another question for a family meeting is what beliefs about money did your family give you? To understand this for yourself is very powerful for your development and building a healthy relationship to money. Then, having the family members share this together will be very revealing about their attitudes to the family and its purpose. Because every one in the family is different, there will be no surprise to find very different attitudes.

Remember, money and the belief systems built around it can do a lot of good in families and also it can do a lot of harm. The key point is to understand both perspectives for your own quality of life, financial planning and also building healthy family relationships and communication.

If you want a really good book to read on this topic, then get the Golden Ghetto by Jessie O’Neill.

Discover Your Investment EQ

The most common cause of low prices is pessimism It’s optimism that is the enemy of the rational buyer.
- Warren Buffett

Ask a group of investors to share the secret to successful investing, and youre likely to get many different quantitatively focused answers, ranging from, hold for the long-term, diversified asset allocation, quality research to the much touted buy low, sell high mantra.

However, recent research into the human mind has found that the secret to success in any long-term endeavor, whether it be in business, relationships or investing, is an attribute called Emotional Intelligence (otherwise known as EQ). EQ is a type of intelligence thats significantly different to the standard IQ-based definition of smart were all used to. The topic of EQ has received significant coverage in the business world in the last few years, fueled in particular by Daniel Golemans books which are aimed at helping business people use the skill to further their careers and effectiveness.

Following the four facet Goleman model for EQ, the emotionally intelligent investor would, for instance, make investment decisions calmly based on a higher consciousness of who they are and with a positive personal relationship to money (the first facet of self-awareness). This is instead of making decisions based on an emotional impulse which sabotages their financial position. They also handle stress, disappointment and uncertainty more rationally, and dont allow those feelings or circumstances to control or initiate their decisions (the second facet of self management).

Going further, the emotionally intelligent investor would also understand the emotions of others such as their partner, spouse or family members, recognizing them and responding with empathy (the third facet of social awareness). Finally, a person with high Investment EQ would have the ability to maintain quality relationships with others around them when making investment decisions knowing how to, effectively and appropriately motivate them and manage their money energy using subtlety, delicacy and tact (the fourth facet of managing others).

But the role of EQ in investment has been little publicized, even though its application can be invaluable for investors. Whether this is because the investment process is seen as an objective, numbers-based, non-emotional process, or whether the investment industry has simply not been made sufficiently aware of the existence of EQ, is unclear. Certainly, we believe that both a high level of EQ, combined with sound financial knowledge, strategy and advice, can make the difference between great investors and the also-rans. But sound financial knowledge will not do it alone.

So why is understanding Investment EQ so powerful? It is the ability to give a person enough confidence, focus and rationality to remain committed to their strategies even when the market value of their portfolio is declining, not living up to expectations, or being superseded by other strategies. Investors with a high EQ, in the long term, worry less about their investments, reap higher returns, and make fewer mistakes.

Daniel Goleman, with his co-authors Annie McKee and Richard E. Boyatzis wrote in Primal Leadership, Negative emotional surges can be overwhelming; theyre the brains way of making us pay attention to a perceived threat. The result is that these emotions swamp the thinking brains capacity to focus on the task at hand, whether its strategic planning or dealing with news of a drop in market share. For investors, the perceived threat, whether it be sluggish investments or a drop in portfolio value, causes the brain to be overwhelmed with negative emotions. Without EQ, or an awareness and ability to manage these emotions, they can and do cause havoc for individual investors, and on a larger scale, for investment markets generally.

Its a reasonably well-documented fact that chasing last years great performers is a poor investment strategy. However, thats how many players in the investment game, even seasoned investors, have made decisions. How often do you see investors with a strategy then not stick to it? It hurts to see someone else doing better than you are, it hurts to see your portfolio performance lagging behind the investment of the moment. Its not the feeling of hurt per se that causes investment damage, but allowing it, even subconsciously, to determine your next investment move.

Emotionally intelligent investors are like the patient driver, sticking to their lane. This doesnt necessarily mean that theyll put up with a poor investment past its used-by date. However, because they have researched their strategies thoroughly, invested in asset classes they understand, and undertaken the volatility level they know they are comfortable with, these investors are able to operate above the emotional level, sticking to their plans unless there are reasonable and rational arguments to do otherwise. They take time to rationally consider their past successes and mistakes, and analyze possible consequences before making the deal.

However, emotionally unintelligent investors often let fear or panic take control, and are more like the aggressive driver, switching lanes whenever something more profitable comes along. They are often after the quick kill, looking for that one deal that theyre going to be able to talk about for years to come, even if this desire is subconscious. These investors often commit to investments they know little about or are not suited to, and when things dont go as planned, panic and confusion sets in ? the worst possible state of mind in which to be making investment decisions. This is certainly not a deliberate strategy, but when our brain chemistry reacts to danger, it causes us to become emotionally charged ? a fight or flight reaction.

Another dangerous trait of the emotionally unintelligent investor is that theres a high likelihood he or she possesses an inflated ego. Research shows that most investors believe, even subconsciously, that they have an edge on others in the market, that they have better intuition than most players and that their technique, whether it be watching stock indices, predicting the behavior of businesses or CEOs or taking the pulse of the investment community, is inherently better than those techniques employed by others.

Ask most players in the investment game which investor they would most like to emulate, and there are good odds that most of them would answer Warren Buffett. Buffett is a prime example of emotionally intelligent investing. His success, in his own words, is not a result of academic-style intelligence, luck or intuition, but rationality, a key factor of EQ. It was this rationality that keeps Buffett committed to his strategy. During the tech bubble, Buffett was widely criticized for not investing in technology stocks, despite their meteoric rises. His rationale was that he didnt understand them, so he wasnt going to invest in them ? an approach that caused more than one of his critics to label him irrelevant. But even if tech stocks hadnt had their dramatic rise and fall, from an EQ perspective, Buffett still did the right thing ? he stuck to his very rational and logical guns ? guns which he knows intimately.

Discovering Your Financial EQ

The good news is that your Investment EQ can be developed. The starting point is with you learning more about your Financial DNA. The following steps will help you with developing your Investment EQ:

? Using the Financial DNA Core Life Profiles, understand and accept your natural instinctive propensities to risk. This will provide very predictive insights into how much uncertainty you will be willing to bear over the long-term and hence how committed you will be to a long-term strategy particularly, when under pressure.

? Then complete the Financial Directions Profile to understand the influences of your environment, experiences and education on the preferences you have for making investment choices. There will be investment strategies which you will have a greater aptitude towards based on what you have learned, whether they be in the stock market, managed funds, real estate/property or with other investment classes.

? Then analyze the Financial Behavior Analysis which documents your complete Financial DNA. This involves reviewing your level of investment alignment by comparing your natural instinctive propensities based on how you are hard-wired to your learned preferences.

? Another important step will be comparing your Financial DNA to the good and poor financial decisions you have actually made in the past. This will help you pinpoint the investment decisions you will be comfortable in making and to identify areas where greater investment education is required.

? Finally, use this behavioral knowledge of your Financial DNA to help you become personally aligned and become more aware in an overall life sense of what decisions you will be comfortable with. The overall dynamics of your life will impact every investment decision and the lives of others you have relationships with.

For more insight into this topic, please read Hugh Massie’s book:
“Financial DNA – Discovering Your Unique Financial Personality for a Quality Life”.