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Would Your Clients Recommend You to a Friend?

Would Your Clients Recommend You to a Friend?

This article first appeared on Nasdaq.

I wonder how many advisors ask their clients some version of, Would you recommend me to your friends?

The advisor-client relationship is a personal one. After all, talking about your money is about as personal as you can get. Why then are advisor organizations still using various forms of gifting to attract more clients, rather than fostering highly engaged clients? (Which I would posit is the best way to attract additional business – by advisors having tailored, meaningful conversations with existing clients.)

Advisor style, client style

To really appreciate the role advisors have in asking the question – would you recommend us to a friend? – it’s important to know the style of each advisor and their client to understand the different behaviors of each at a deeper level. If advisors do not have any understanding of behavioral differences, they will not be able to connect with clients sufficiently (deeply) enough to be able to broach this question.

Every time an advisor meets with their client, the conversations they have, the advice given and the stories they exchange should all lead to the final exchange – would you recommend me/us to a friend? Whether they actually make a referral is only part of the equation; one thing you are really asking is, Are they happy, well-served and do any adjustments need to be made to your relationship?

The outgoing, engaging, conversationalist client will more likely recommend, without being asked, if the service is good and if the exchange was both helpful and fun. They also will be the first to say negative things when the service is not right.

The more reserved, quiet client who is contented with the service they are receiving may well recommend you to close friends without being prompted to do so. And they likely would not actively share negative experiences they have had with their advisor with others unless prompted to do so.

People are different. Each has their own unique personality. Trying to attract new business with a one-size-fits-all approach will never work. Again, the key is to invest in understanding individual behaviors at a deeper level, then using this insight to bridge the gap to manage the differences. Also, technology solutions can be deployed to help manage the customization of the different behavioral experiences required.

So, what’s getting in the way of this approach? Clearly much depends on the individual behaviors of both the advisors and the clients.

Think ahead

The next generation of investors will have little or no experience of face-to-face connection. They will rely on technology to do business. To receive the customized and compliant service they want from a provider will be determined not just through the outcomes of successful advice, but even more importantly, through understanding the behaviors of their advisors and how closely the different personality styles align.

Next-gen clients will:

  • Expect you to get to know them;
  • Want you to understand their life goals;
  • Demand that advice lines up with the grand plans they have for their future; and
  • Expect or even require you to advise and counsel them on how to take appropriate steps to achieve their goals.

(Hint: Get ahead of the game by meeting these needs now, and not waiting for the next generation to tell you what they want.)

Balance traditional and tech

For many, the personal touch will always best the remote tech solution. But it is not for everyone all the time through the client life cycle. Getting the balance right by understanding behavioral differences and managing them is where relationship success sits. Yes, the introduction of technology can be seen as a negative disrupter, but it isn’t.

Building a strong connection with clients based on understanding their behavior will reveal those who explicitly want a face-to-face interaction, and those who prefer a digital solution (at least to some degree). Knowing how to manage these differences and different expectations is where meaningful conversations can be developed.

Once a relationship is built, connection can be maintained via any media. Reliance on technology to stay connected with family and friends and keep each other up to date with happenings is now the norm. Why wouldn’t the advisor-client relationship more heavily invest in the use of technology, as it also enables scaling customized experiences for each client?

Interestingly many observers of the financial services industry cite technology as the “rogue,” yet if a personal relationship is what is required, where better to forge these relationships than through the smarter use of technology?

Grow and win

When advisors invest in knowing how to deal with different behavioral styles, the first question after the initial face-to-face client meeting with a client should not be – would you recommend us? – but, Would it be good to stay in touch more regularly online?

Consider leveraging digital technology solutions while making sure that offline communication with clients is not ruled out completely. Not all advisors or clients will be comfortable with this. But if you have no understanding of behavioral styles, you will never know who to target with this 2020 approach to delivering financial advice, which can build deep relationships to grow the business.

So, if you want to build business through clients referring you, first build a behaviourally smart financial planning process, and then add on or adapt tech solutions to enable a customized behavioral experience for every client. Of course, through greater behavioral understanding you will know the more outgoing clients in your portfolio who will be comfortable to step out in the world to recommend you.

It just may be that technology will also provide a way for more of the naturally reserved clients to make referrals as well. Forget investing in “nice to haves” and “consumables” – products – to attract new clients and build referrals. Start investing in understanding human behavior and how it can be practically applied – for your benefit and for the benefit of your clients. A win-win.

It’s in this atmosphere of genuine connectivity that an advisor’s services can grow, both in depth and reach.

How to Become a Behaviorally Smart Advisor

How to Become a Behaviorally Smart Advisor

The financial services industry needs new business models ones that help re-define what a financial advisor is capable of beyond just a numbers oriented investment orientation. The traditional twenty-five year + model of providing investment access and selection is being disrupted by technology and new players coming from other industries. The friction from this evolving operating environment seems to be leading to exploring more holistic and new client-focused experiences that create more engagement and deeper connections.

The Institute for Innovation Development, to explore this further, recently talked with Leon Morales, Managing Director of DNA Behavior International a behavioral finance technology platform designed for financial advisors to Know, Engage and Grow their relationships with their clients and prospects. We discussed the evolving nature and changing value proposition of financial advisors into this more holistic model with advisors serving as client behavioral coaches and mentors.

Hortz: You have frequently quoted from the Spring 2000 Journal of Investing article that states 93.6% of the financial planning process is the behavioral management of clients. We have always understood that being an advisor is, bottom-line, a relationship business but, what does that number tell us about the true nature of the financial advisor role

Morales: All the studies and resulting data that have looked at the issue appear to agree, that client behavioral management is one of, if not the, most important function of financial advisors. Understanding the clients communication style, personality, emotions and fears, these need to be mastered and managed by the advisor. Learning practical ways to understand the individuality of clients, how they make decisions and what triggers their emotions, are key to being able to guide the client over the longer term successfully, coaching them to truly achieve financial goals. What this points to is the ultimate importance of advisors being behavioral managers as much as they are technical managers of investments.

Hortz:What do you recommend as the key steps advisors must take to start strengthening their behavioral IQ and behavioral management skills with clients?

Morales: The most important step required for moving from the traditional financial advisor role to that of a Wealth Mentor is to learn first how to ask much better questions of the client. This enhanced discussion builds greater client relationships and opens the dialogue to reveal core behaviors, biases, reactions under pressure and other issues. Part of our Certified Wealth Mentor program’s takeaways is a list of many key conversation opener questions, used for client meetings. Further, the questions will encourage the clients to probe their own thinking. The advisor then gains insight into how the client makes decisions, the client’s reaction to taking a new direction, or confirmation they are on the right path.

Together with insights from our behavioral reports, this enables the advisor to identify points of alignment between what’s stated in the report, versus what clients are saying. This comparison enables the advisor to zero in on the clients areas of strengths and struggles and narrows down the tension between processes and behaviors that might get in the way of delivering outcomes. This kind of client connection, using our very concrete system, builds long term advisor/client relationships and advisors will know how to manage client bias and reaction under pressure.

Hortz: What are some predictable insights you can discover about your clients

Morales: Our DNA Discovery process delivers insights in several key areas:

  • Communication- -enables advisors to connect and work with the client on their terms
  • Biases – – awareness of assumptions or mental habits that need managing
  • Spending patterns –uncovers money habits that may impact investment strategies and outcomes
  • Risk tolerance and reaction to market movement- provides detailed behavioral insight into the client’s natural risk tolerance and risk propensity

Hortz: Can you walk us through your claim that a behavioral approach, using your wealth management platform, results in 99.5% client solution suitability and additional client value

Morales: The use of the Financial DNA behavioral approach enables the advisor to more deeply engage with their clients. Asking the right questions, and having a robust discovery process that more rigorously breaks down all the elements that make up risk, to a much tighter client discussion, reveals how much risk really needs to be taken, how much risk could financially be taken, and blending learned behavior and natural behavior to cover the right level of risk. Behaviorally smart advisors -who manage these conversations with the client well – will get a much higher level of suitability in what they recommend and what gets deployed or purchased in the end.

Dalbar research shows that 7.45% a year is the potential loss because of investors not having an advisor and making poor decisions. There is safety for clients in having a behaviorally smart wealth mentor manage their portfolio, rather than trading their own accounts. This goes back to the risk profiling where we believe we can get to 99.5% clients solution suitability. Therefore, 91% reflects accuracy from the DNA Natural Behavior Discovery and the other 8.5% comes from the learned behavior discovery.

Hortz: Do you see an evolution in what a financial advisor’s core job is and how they will be perceived in the future?

Morales: Yes. I believe that the advisor needs to become a guide for life for the client and to be able to navigate all the issues clients might face. When the client sees the advisor as their go to person for help with decisions, a trusted collaborator, that not only impacts their financial and investment world, but also life decisions and choices, all of which are foundational and have financial consequences. This kind of advisor-client relationship opens wider conversations regarding family dynamics. Advisors need to be the family advisor, and that’s going to be a big area for them in the future. To do that, they need to broaden their skills to handle a wider range of areas, or at least be able to communicate about them.

Importantly, a core adjustment required is the change from client meetings to client conversations. The word conversation makes the advisor/client engagement process easier, less formal, more likely to deliver open discussions. This adjustment is the process we have been bringing in to some of the firms we have worked with recently.

Hortz: How do you help advisors change their habits and ways of doing business to help them evolve into this new advisor business model

Morales: While education and our Certified Wealth Mentor Program are an important part of the process, a key strategy for DNA Behavior International, in order to help advisors make this happen, is to embrace our role as a behavioral Fintech company. We can now take our behavioral tools, processes and knowledge and embed that into their practices through an easy, accessible, online behavioral platform which provides them with practical and scalable behavioral intelligence across every client and firm employee. They would have readily available behavioral awareness, using our built-in discovery processes, and real-time behavioral management capabilities using our apps. Behavioral management can now be infused into the DNA of the firm.

Hortz: Tell us a little about your steadily growing list of strategic partners (BrilliantFIT, AMP) and how you work with them in extending your behavioral platform and resources to equally support advisors, clients, and other key financial services vendor firms

Morales: We have a wide range of technology integration able to be deployed, not just in the financial services arena, but across many disciplines and industries. With Financial DNA, we are a leader in the deployment of personality and behavioral based tools, but we also have such relationships as our hiring partner Brilliant Fit, based in Melbourne, Australia. They are making inroads by integrating behavioral discovery to the filtering of candidates for management roles and ongoing career development.

We built an alignment with Salesforce, so DNA insights are on the Salesforce platform. We are also currently working with firms on matching advisors to clients based on personality styles. We work with big data to open a significant access to leads by building algorithms to be able to link that data to personalities. We are working with a range of financial planning software groups globally using our behavioral chip strategy to power the behavioral management of the client experience.

Hortz: From your perspective in building to and working with a wide cross-section of financial advisors, what is your best advice for advisors in how to navigate this changing business environment in which they are now operating?

Morales: From my perspective, the first key point would be for advisors to develop their emotional intelligence (EQ). Personal development will make them more effective advisors as they interact with a wider range of clients. Maturing professionally in this way will make them a better advisor in guiding others through life challenges again, an expansion of their roles beyond financial guidance. This approach is what will lead to sustainability of the relationship.

Also vitally important are building more processes inside their businesses, particularly around technology, to enable a customized experience to be delivered. Introducing good technology releases advisors to build business and identify gaps where they need to hire and develop good teams.

A further key area is looking at existing revenue models. The current approach needs to be reviewed considering the changing role of advisors with the ability of advisors to become behavioral coaches to their clients. Knowing the importance of behavioral management, advisors can use these behavioral insights to look at how they make their money.

Delivering goals-based financial planning means advisors need to look at how they bring in a retainer fee for working with the clients on an ongoing basis. The new revenue model needs to reflect: running the annual meetings, helping the clients work out their goals, navigating difficult decision-making situations and transitions. Price points can be reviewed, as they add value through mentoring- coaching clients on how to manage their behaviors towards their goals.

Ill leave advisors with one of the favorite quotes of our founder, Hugh Massie: Strict rationality kills culture and relationships, and unmanaged emotions destroy wealth. Financial advisors will be well served to be able to deeply engage and reconcile client thinking and behavior with that clients life and wealth goals.

Written by Bill Hortz, Founder & Dean, Institute for Innovation Development

The Institute for Innovation Development is an educational and business development catalyst for growth-oriented financial advisors and financial services firms determined to lead their businesses in an operating environment of accelerating business and cultural change. We position our members with the necessary ongoing innovation resources and best practices to drive and facilitate their next-generation growth, differentiation and unique community engagement strategies. The institute was launched with the support and foresight of our founding sponsors – Pershing, Voya Financial, Ultimus Fund Solutions, Fidelity, and Charter Financial Publishing (publisher of Financial Advisor and Private Wealth magazines). For more information click here .

Are You a Behaviorally Smart Consultant?

Are You a Behaviorally Smart Consultant?

Some of the greatest and most successful businesses started in a garage, on a kitchen table, or the idea was first written in a childlike dream journal.

Many of us broke away from safe salaried positions to step out on our own. Not having the desire to chase the corporate or entrepreneurial dream, but all with a passion in our heart and all wanting to be an independent consultant in our chosen field.

But for every consultancy there is a time when you face a cross road. Maybe the consultancy has plateaued and you just can’t get it to the next level without more framework, processes and, importantly, insights. Most consultants know that place and sometimes the solution to re-start the motor comes from the most unexpected places.

It could be a chance meeting; a never before identified hole in the market that you can fill; a restructuring of your target audience or a chance reading of an article like this.

We at DNA Behavior International are looking for YOU.

Not your clients, not your expertise (well, that would be interesting to hear about). We are looking for consultants who know they need another valuable tool in their kit to be able to offer a higher level of expertise to their clients, deploying behavioral insights inside organizations.

Some 20 years ago a conversation took place in which a couple of minds shared their frustration with how they were being served in the financial services industry and we thought, if they had known how to communicate with us, if they had known how to understand who we are and what we were trying to achieve in life they would have kept us as clients. Needless to say, they didn’t.

But the conversation turned to a broader range of topics. Why, we asked each other, do service providers neither know or care who we the client (or customer) is?

We then moved our conversation into our own areas of expertise and what we could do to save the world, or at least, failing businesses. This is what we talked about:

  • How can a service provider get to know what makes their client tick?
  • If they could, would that mean they could offer a more effective service?
  • Would they need enhanced skills in building interpersonal relationships?
  • Would understanding a persons inherent behavior change the way businesses operate?

For example:

  • How people were hired
  • Who was hired
  • Who is the ideal client
  • Building a healthy corporate culture
  • Team spirit
  • Leadership – what approach works, what doesn’t work and how willing would they be to put People before Numbers
  • Would communication be different
  • Might there be fewer conflicts in need of resolution
  • Would individuals have a greater sense of responsibility and passion to delivering the vision of the business
  • And would getting the behaviors right and understood radically impact how clients are treated and how much more likely they are to stay with you)
  • Could the bottom line of a business consultants work be improved if they knew how to impact the behaviors of the clients they work with?

So, here’s what was birthed some 20 years ago out of that conversation.

DNA Behavior International is a behavioral sciences business which uses validated behavioral insights to enable organizations to deliver customized employee and client experiences. In particular, it helps people and businesses with effective communication, operating in their strengths, managing emotions and making smart decisions that helps individuals and organizations discover and leverage strengths.

And this is why we are looking for YOU.

We want to find consultancies who want to partner with us to build their practices/businesses.

We are not focusing on consultants in any specific industry; we’ve found that every kind of industry always has an element of people and behaviors where there is a need to know, engage and grow every client and their employees and clients, to build a behaviorally smart business, that in turn grows your consultancy.

What we are looking for are consultants who want to grow their business using scientifically validated behavioral intelligence solutions.

This is a call to arms for all such business owners who are currently engaged in delivering services to organizations.

Whether you provide coaching, mentoring, training, 0r HR functions, and from the C-suite to the shop floor, DNA Behavior International is looking for you

Partner with us, and our behavioral intelligence solutions will unlock business value for you and your clients and give you a significant competitive edge.

We at DNA Behavior International will be the point of difference that sets you apart from other business consultants.

This solution is already in use worldwide in major industries; we have decided to widen our relationship to include your consultancy.

DNA Behavior International is an international authority in the field of scientifically based insight into Natural Behavior Discovery. It is the world’s only all-in-one behavioral intelligence business platform for reliably discovering all dimensions of personality.

  • Its use can solve 87%of business issues.
  • It can improve employee productivity by up to 40%.
  • It increases team productivity by up to 70%.
  • It increases revenues by 23% per year

So, if you want to know more and receive a complimentary discovery process then link with me and/or message me. carol.pocklington@dnabehavior.com

financial-advisors-are-you-ready-to-embrace-artificial-intelligence

Financial Advisors: Are You Ready To Embrace Artificial Intelligence?

This article first appeared on Nasdaq.

And the hits keep coming, so to speak. Never has every move, decision, and interaction with clients of financial advisors been analyzed to this degree. And that will only become more prevalent. Any form of questionable practice will be identified and challenged. It begs the question, are financial advisors ready to embrace artificial intelligence?

The use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools to monitor regulatory compliance is a conversation that is heating up, not just within financial services firms, but within regulatory agencies who are now considering both AI and machine-learning tools to enforce compliance.

This increased automation using AI focuses on Know Your Customer (KYC) rules, Anti-Money Laundering (AML) rules, and tax reporting.

AI isn’t all about policing the industry; its broader use can be used for financial advisors to analyze and understand how account holders spend, invest and make financial decisions, so they can customize the advice they give. The role of the financial advisor will change significantly as machines take over routine aspects of the service offering. The gap left is the key to improving the financial service.

Many organizations that deliver support to financial advisors recognize the importance of understanding people before numbers in financial planning. These organizations tend to be early adopters of AI.

Behaviorally smart financial advisors already use a validated scientific discovery process with their customers in advance of the first meeting. This measurable insight into the customer’s personality, the client’s communication style, risk patterns, decision-making approach, and reactionary market movement pressure points, is available at every touch point so clients can be managed honestly, openly and transparently.

The significance of revealing natural and instinctive financial personality and delivering targeted advice provides assurance, so advisors know the client at the deepest level – among other reasons, to mitigate compliance risks.

Information obtained from the use of an automated discovery process puts clients at the center of the financial planning process; matches advisory teams, clients, goals, and solutions; enables a customized communication approach at all stages of the client lifecycle; builds tailored portfolios; behaviorally manages client emotions; and enhances compliance and reduces complaints.

The financial industry is waking up to the use of AI. It is asking the right questions in terms of how it can add value to business models and satisfy regulatory requirements – thus demonstrating to a skeptical public that they are cleaning up their houses.

Like all technology, AI needs to be in partnership with humans. Financial advisors who use a validated financial personality discovery process work more effectively and efficiently by filtering key information from their client’s online personality profiles to inform the advice they give.

The danger is that too much focus is placed on the use of AI for detecting and analyzing brand sentiment or providing investment insights, even identifying rogue behavior – and yet missing the greater use: Getting to know the customer at a deeper level to deliver the best and most accurate advice.

The financial sector is, in a sense, being forced into this new world. Lack of trust, media and regulatory bodies sharpening their focus on compliance ensure the industry is rushing to find solutions that satisfy regulatory compliance, including staying within the bounds of the DOL’s new fiduciary rule.

Traditionally, a slow-adapter industry, the financial sector has been dipping its toe in the water in terms of using robo-advisors. Investors are drawn to this service as they no longer need to pay substantial fees for something they don’t want, need or in some cases get.

Artificial Intelligence used as a tool to put the client front and center of financial advice can and should be pursued. Technology that reveals below-the-surface information about clients will empower advisors to proactively engage said clients on what matters to them the most and on their terms.

Financial advisors, whether individual practitioners or part of a corporate organization, can no longer get away with pushing inappropriate product to investors. The customers are smarter, and the regulators clued in, so what is the smartest change to make to begin to get back the trust of customers? AI.

Get to know your customer at a deeper financial and personal level. Uncover what they want to do with their wealth. Build a relationship based on understanding their inherent approach to life, offering emotional support and becoming the go-to person when they make life decisions.

Much can and will inevitably be managed by AI automation, but most investors will want the human touch. An advisor who knows the importance of a quick phone call to a client when markets wobble or sending an interesting opportunity to an investor able to manage risk – these are the service touch points that maintain or help rebuild trust in the industry.

Financial advisors need to embrace artificial intelligence in general, and financial personality discovery tools in particular, if they are to stay ahead of the game, deliver more relevant offerings to the client and build long-term relationships.

Why not complete your own complimentary profile and see which behavioral biases may affect your financial decision-making. Click here.

To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit DNA Behavior.

are-we-hardwired-to-derail-our-own-investments

Are We Hardwired To Derail Our Own Investments?

This article first appeared on Nasdaq.

People don’t make rational decisions, including decisions about investing. The degree to which we make ludicrous choices depends on our DNA. (No, really; bear with me.) Decision making by both investors and advisors can be less reckless if we don’t understand more about individual behaviors and why we make the financial decisions we do. Are we hardwired to derail our own investments?

Factor into this mix emotion and a lack of financial education, and this further increases the likelihood that decision making can be faulty for both advisors and investors. Getting inside our brains to see what’s going on when we make decisions is not only doable, it’s also measurable.

As behavioral finance (think How and why we make the financial decisions we do) goes mainstream, investor behavior has become more accepted as the major influence on investment performance. If advisors have no read on how or why investors make certain decisions, mistakes will be made.

So how does one become what I would call Behaviorally Smart? According to its annual Quantitative Analysis of Investor Behavior, Dalbar – a financial services market research firm – says investment losses to individual investors due to their behavior is an average of 8 percent per year over the last 30 years.

And this is not just limited to the investor. Based on a study by Cabot Research, professional investment managers are leaving 1 percent to 3 percent a year on the table, which is significant when you realize the size of these large portfolios. So even the professionals who use sophisticated technology and extensive research make mental errors in decision making.

After all, they are human and must manage cognitive biases and emotions when under pressure. The more aware you are of yourself and what makes you successful and what causes failure, the better off you’re going to be financially and professionally.

FDNA

So, how can investors improve? There is no simple tonic to improved performance, as this requires wholesale behavioral change – a paradigm shift in how someone engages the world around them. The key, then, is understanding your unique financial personality. Among other things, this insight provides a greater level of self-awareness: Why do we repeat our mistakes?

Advisors and investors alike need to develop an investment process that provides a check yourself before you wreck yourself step to mitigate these blind spots.

Through more than 15 years of research, I have learned that easily identifiable behavioral traits lead to patterns of decision making that are very closely aligned with the structure of an investors portfolio. In other words, the combination of traits and patterns makes up your financial personality style. Your portfolio, therefore, mirrors who you are. In fact, investors should look at their portfolio as the composition of all their decisions and not just a series of market positions.

The reality is that some behavioral biases cost more than others. Based on Cabot Research, the top four ways the brain can wreck investment performance are:

  • The Endowment Effect – Holding winners too long. The investor falls in love with a winner and loses sight of the fact that its best days are gone. There is the fear of selling the position too early.
  • Risk Aversion – Selling young winners too early. The investor has fears about the future and does not want to take the bumps in the road as the stock increases in value.
  • Loss Aversion – Holding losers for too long. The investor is fearful of taking a loss and ends up with a portfolio full of losers.
  • Regret Aversion – Not adding to winners when they take off. This is an investor who is hesitant in their decision-making and backs out of building the stock position as it gains momentum.

Based on your history of decision-making, which of these patterns have cost you the most? And remember, there are many other behavioral biases, which, coupled with these, will further contribute to reduced performance. To help you on the journey of closing the investment performance gap, start with self-awareness of your behavioral traits.

For investors, this could be as simple as asking your advisor if he or she uses a validated behavioral insights tool that looks beyond risk-tolerance testing. For advisors, the time and money invested in adopting such a process can pay big dividends for you and your client, pun intended.

To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit Financial DNA. https://financialdna.com/

Why not complete your own complimentary profile and see which behavioral biases may affect your financial decision-making? Click here

Bridge the Relationship Gap to Engage Clients

More and more evidence is emerging suggesting Gen D (digital generation) represent an interesting developing market for financial services firms. Gen D are attracted by social media, they expect it to be evidenced in all areas of their life. Importantly they will look for this approach from their advisors who in turn must understand the importance of building trust with Gen D through the use of social media.

Interestingly, Gen D is not necessarily age related rather media savvy related. Good communication today doesnt involve changing the what of the message, but the how. Clients who fall into the Gen D bracket want to know you are on social media. Thats where they will look for you. Thats where building trust begins and where the voice of the customer is becoming the loudest. It falls to advisors to understand the importance not only of social media but how best to engage with a wide age range of potential clients through gaining behavioral awareness.

Having recently read an interesting article from Accenture following a survey they conducted into how Gen D investors approach wealth management its clear that the financial industry must change their approach to the use of social media if they are to attract, build trust with and maintain long term relationships with Gen D.? Click here to read the full article from Accenture.

Visit the Financial DNA website to learn more about building trust with clients and bridge the relationship gap.