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How to Get Started With Financial DNA in 5 Steps

Financial DNA is a comprehensive and customizable tool. It will guide you to work alongside your clients as they tune into their financial personality and money habits. 

By using the very same tool top advisors around the world are using, you will be able to enhance your investor experience. We have created this guide to seamlessly assist you in getting started with Financial DNA.

Step 1: Set up your admin system

If you purchased Financial DNA through an enterprise, your account may have come pre-configured with some basic settings to get started. If so, you can skip this step. Otherwise, if you did purchase it on your own, you can easily upload your logo and apply a few basic settings to get started. 

If you sign up for a Financial DNA package, there are several different customization options available. You can customize the web-screens and reports with your logo after signing in. If you were not directed to do this, please contact our support team so they may assist you in customizing your profile. 

Step 2: Customize your messaging

The best way to learn something is to try it for yourself, and Financial DNA is no different. By testing it out yourself, you will go through the steps as an investor would so you will always be talking from first-hand experience.

Once you have completed your own Financial DNA, it’s time to start inviting others. We do have a variety of free templates that you are free to use to assist you in creating compelling email invitations that others will want to join. 

Step 3: Recruit your 5 first users

You’ll soon see how Financial DNA can be used to help your clients. Invite five friends or family members to use Financial DNA to complete their own discoveries and you will quickly understand how ‘real-life’ actions translate into our DNA reports. 

Financial DNA is here to assist you in being comfortable and familiar with our product fast.

In the previous step, we provided sample invitations for you to use to invite family members and friends. Once they have completed their DNA,  you will be able to practice your client conversations with them using these results so that you can become familiar with Behaviorally SMART conversations.

Step 4: Review & connect

Step 5: Schedule your coaching session

Another useful advantage to you is that our team will invite you for a free one-on-one coaching session with our coach, which is included with each Financial DNA package.  

In this interactive call we’ll answer any questions you have about what is included in your package and provide an opportunity for some hands-on practice, debriefing clients using our Behavioral Smart Meeting approach, so you are well prepared to be able to confidently converse with your own potential clients.

Conclusion

Financial DNA is the future of advisor/investor relationships. Top investors in the world are using it, and so should you. 

The best way to discover and learn about Financial DNA is to try it out yourself with a free trial

We’re all about giving people an easy way into getting started on this financial journey, which means that we offer you this 5 step guide to getting started right now, where users can get acquainted with our platform before they commit to anything long term. 

We are sure you can see the benefits of using Financial DNA and should this now be something you want to explore further, please go ahead and access our free trial and get started working towards your advisor/ investor goals. 

Capitalize on ESG Investing Via Your Tech Stack

– First Published on Nasdaq –

The 1990s introduced “the triple bottom line” as a measure of the integrity and sustainability of a business. Investors wanted to know their money was doing something meaningful, understanding that the “triple” in question is profit, people and the planet. The concept evolved into Environmental, Social and Corporate Governance (ESG) and is increasingly mainstream, less niche.

In fairness, the ’90s didn’t have the technology to support ESG. But now advisors can have validated information at the touch of a button, if they have first invested in tech and data (gathering). For instance, today’s advisors can have a client complete a simple, scientifically validated questionnaire that reveals essential information. This enables the advisor to make accurate, appropriate investment suggestions that match the client personality and risk tolerance, as well as their ESG inclinations.

In support of such, every financial advisory business has some form of tech stack. If it’s easier, think of it as the data ecosystem – all of the tech the firm invests in. Still, not everyone has a plug-in that leverages that tech stack by revealing important behavioral data on clients or delivers behaviorally focused scripts on guiding clients. For those without such, tech makes such a plug-in easily accessible, without reinventing the existing tech stack.

Amp up advice with tech

Connecting technology with financial advice and behavior enables advisors to work more effectively with people.

Tech stacks that match clients to advisors and not just safeguard against advisors putting clients into high-risk or low-risk investments can help advisors fully appreciate what ESG means to clients. Behaviorally understanding clients and taking a figurative walk in their shoes is always beneficial in other ways too. This is when a financial advisor and client can truly develop a solid partnership with a mutual view of the world (including as it pertains to ESG investment needs).

Talking recently to a colleague about this very subject, I was interested to learn that a large gap often exists in the tech capability of firms and the very financial advisors who want and need real-time nudging data on and for clients. While advisors are struggling to keep all the balls in the air, my colleague’s firm steps into the gap to work with advisors to understand the tech stack at their fingertips, so they can use it effectively. (And why not maximize that tech investment?).

One such area: Understanding the client’s need to invest in ESG businesses. What’s behind the “whys,” among other questions. Is it to feel good, look good or to genuinely see such an approach delivering not only wealth creation but a quality life?

For advisors to listen and understand the behavioral shift in investors (their clients!), they need to better connect people to technology and business requirements in order to get investors to accurately connect. (That’s where the aforementioned discovery questionnaire pays dividends.) This enables advisors to deliver targeted advice that satisfies ESG requirements for the investor.

An advisor’s most significant impact must surely be in connecting – via technology – investor feelings to the investment strategy that matches their emotions and still creates the wealth they require for life goals. When advisors get this right, it delivers an incredible capacity to bring about positive change in investors’ lives.

THAT is the bigger picture of the advisor-client relationship – and one that is easy to lose sight of, when focusing on the proverbial trees.

Where ESG comes from, is going…

The shift toward ESG doesn’t always come from an analytical brain; more often it originates from feelings. If this past year has taught us anything, it’s that we are all taking time to consider the next season of our lives, including what we will focus on. What we might do differently.

Thus, savvy advisors are alert to the market for ESG-based investing as it becomes both increasingly popular and more complex, primarily due to upcoming regulatory and compliance changes.

Even now, there are indications that all providers of financial products must consider client ESG preferences when deciding and advising the suitability of investments. Firms and advisors who have already invested in tech that fosters tailored, behaviorally focused client and portfolio management are ahead of that curve – already meeting or exceeding standards that have not even been implemented yet.

In-depth data at an advisor’s fingertips is what this market demands, especially when it comes to popular niches like ESG investing. Advisors can provide more informed, focused and client-specific client guidance. On the flip, clients can make more informed, less-stressful investment decisions, while also seeing that they are part of a process in which they are “seen” and heard and which they can be confident is transparent.

These are some of my insights regarding ESG and technological solutions; I’d love to hear your insights on the same.

ESG Investing: A Match for Post-Pandemic Outlook

– First Published on Nasdaq –

Interest in ESG investing has risen significantly in recent years. So, what is it?

ESG represents Environmental, Social and (Corporate) Governance factors as a measure of sustainability and social impact of an investment. It’s intended as another “lens” investors and advisors may want to use, alongside, not usurping, financial factors.

For years, ESG issues were a secondary concern for investors. It was often seen as “alternative” or nice to have but not mainstream. Sometimes not even taken seriously. Increasingly, clients are initiating ESG conversations.

One of the reasons may be that ESG investing has been shown to potentially present the greatest opportunity for portfolios. No longer an esoteric offering, financial advisors could well fall behind and lose clients if they fail to identify what issues are important to clients and help them build their portfolio in a way that reflects their values.

Add to that the fact that people have been very reflective during the pandemic; thus, many are beginning to see how various aspects of their lives – including their investments – line up with their values. ESG investments may be one of the answers for which they are searching.

Leverage conversation, technology

Many advisors are accustomed to having conventional conversations with their clients, without knowing those clients at a deeper level. Don’t be tentative or judgmental: Have the conversations to establish if and where clients fit in terms of ESG investing. Some will have base knowledge of the topic; others will appreciate a succinct ESG tutorial.

Advisors may not even realize that some of their clients are already researching companies’ records on environmental sustainability, social responsibility and governance (think transparency and accountability). Other clients may not know ESG investing is not just a nice-to-have approach, but can be a genuine, productive metric of investment potential and returns.

How can technology and data facilitate these conversations? Tech and data provide advisors and analysts with information about companies worthy of investment. It delivers data to advisors based on verified performance, demonstrating that companies worthy of investment are genuinely ESG compliant and are not just one of the in-name-only players.

Better still, tech and data can help advisors and even investors themselves understand the decision-making behaviors of investors. Especially as we come out of pandemic lockdown, in which everyone is increasingly comfortable with remote interactions, advisors need to have behavioral insights at their fingertips. As we all work “leaner,” insights provide an edge for advisors and firms committed to rethink and reshape how they deliver wealth management advice in our rapidly changing world.

Broaching ESG option

The real challenge for many financial advisors is that they aren’t sure how to have ESG conversations with clients. Many might feel asking about a person’s commitment, or not, to environmental and social issues is fraught with landmines. And, if advisors have not done their homework, they could be left flat footed as they genuinely do not know which companies are worthy of ESG investing.

So, how can advisors avoid the potential pitfalls of discussing ESG with clients? Like so many life conversations, such a discussion flows best when each contributor to the exchange understands their inherent behavior. (Again, with tech and data informing both the advisor and client perspectives and their “take” on each other.)

Communication style

An advisor whose style is to converse with authority and who has a strong drive to reach goals and deliver results, may suggest investment opportunities in industries compliant with ESG, where returns are likely to be significant…but they also may fail to “hear” their client.

A colleague recently shared the story of an interaction he had with a former advisor: When the colleague-client noted to his advisor that he did not want to invest in certain types of companies (decidedly not ESG ones and which differed from his core values), the advisor responded, “Well, I guess you are not interested in returns.”

Not only is that untrue of most ESG investments, that kind of response shuts down communication, damages the relationship and likely negatively affects success for both advisor and client. Having tech- and data-driven behavioral insights in hand could have changed the trajectory of things for both client and advisor.

On the flip, a client who is reflective and needs time to research and consider options and who would prefer to invest in a low-return investment but with a business who has a greater commitment to ESG, could feel pressured and withdraw from the conversation. So, again, understanding a client’s innate approach and reactions to stress and money decisions, as well as how they best communicate and are communicated to, could have brought alignment, understanding and, most importantly, productive communication to this scenario.

The time for ESG is now

With “behaviorally smart” tech and data integrated into their other systems, an advisor can, at the touch of a button, have real time information in front of them to understand client behavior, bias, and decision-making and communication style. This enables a higher level of advisor-client compatibility – and that’s the road to success.

Likewise, behavioral data gathering tools deliver practical insights so advisors can understand which clients they have significant behavioral differences with. It also would offer insights into how best to manage the differences. Ex: How and when do I communicate with this client to maximize outcomes for all parties involved?

In all communication exchanges, adapting behavior to relate to another person requires concentrating more on a level of self-awareness. There is no doubt ESG investing is delivering a huge shift in emphasis to financial markets and curious investors.

In a more reflective, post-pandemic world, more investors are looking to be part of global environmental and social solutions, working when they can with organizations that get things right on governance. These investors expect their advisors to be on top of their game in terms of understanding what they the client are trying to achieve. Knowing how to have the corresponding dialogue with them on ESG issues creates a win-win.

Financial services businesses that invest in tech stack solutions that provide tools to support ESG investing will be significantly more successful than their competitors. Not only will they be known for the proactive, positive impact they are having on society, they will undoubtedly enhance their organization’s long-term financial value and build client wealth in line with client wishes and, by nature, the greater good.

Financial DNA Empowering Female Voices

Earlier this year, I sat down with Danny Liberatore from The Wealth Enrichment Financial Group to discuss the impact Financial DNA has had on his practice, and how it transformed the way he works with his clients. 

Working with female investors

One of my biggest takeaways from our identity conversation was Danny’s approach in working with female investors. He mentioned that most of his clients are females and that Financial DNA insights have enabled him to foster meaningful relationships with them.

You see, female investors don’t want to be treated any differently than men, however, their communications styles are different. They want to be part of the process. They have a savviness for the intricacies of our work and appreciate the educational part of it all.

Danny Liberatore

Behavioral finance insights particularly come into play in this situation when you are working with male and female partners. Their dynamics unravel from day one, and you need to pay attention to their behaviors in order to understand them better and manage their biases.

Involve both in the conversation

Danny shared with me that most of the time, the women are different from their partners, in terms of behavior and responsiveness. 

It is no secret that the financial service industry has done a very poor job trying to understand women and genuinely helping them. What happens more often than not is that they are being ignored and their opinions are unsolicited or unappreciated. 

As a financial advisor, you need to be able to wear different hats when working with couples. When you make the effort of explaining things differently to your clients and accordingly to their behavioral styles, you get instant breakthroughs. 

Danny mentioned that he’s made it a habit to always address the wife first and disclose to the husband that while he might be addressing him later on separately, he doesn’t want him to feel ignored or unappreciated. He will ensure to bring the husband back into the conversation and keep her engaged.

The truth is, once you honestly explain your process, your clients instantly feel included. It not only puts them at ease, but it builds trust. And we all know that trust is a fundamental factor in advisor/client relationships. 

This is a common situation for FI’s to find themselves in. When the female is not the breadwinner or the creator of the wealth, you’ve got to make her even more involved, without leaving the male out either.

How it usually starts 

When meeting with a potential client for the first time, pay very close attention to the couple dynamics as they unravel before you. It is common for men to take on the lead role in a conversation with their advisor, especially at the beginning. 

However, if it gets to the point where the female’s opinion is not taken into consideration or is not solicited at all in the planning process, that should be a red flag for you. You need to make the effort to always keep them engaged and involve them in the conversation.

You can also look at it from a business perspective. Let’s say you are taking on this new client that has great assets and potential for revenue growth. If you strictly focus on working with the husband, when life happens and you find yourself in an intergenerational wealth transfer situation, what are your chances to still be the financial advisor for that family? 

Final thoughts..

When working with your clients, it might feel normal to engage the one partner that takes on the role of leader and simply overlook the other. The risk you are running there is to not only alienate one of the decision makers but also falling victim to your own status quo biases. Pay attention to your client’s dynamics, keep both of them engaged, and build what could potentially be a lifetime working relationship.

Do Investors See Value in Wealth Management? They should, and Here’s Why

Do Investors See Value in Wealth Management? They should, and Here’s Why 

The 2020 financial climate may have been the most tumultuous of its decade. However, one thing is sure, demand for wealth management continues to grow. Today’s investors are looking for a comprehensive approach from financial institutions that would guide them forward in this new normal.

The truth is, even in the middle of this pandemic-induced uncertainty and market volatility, executive wealth management decisions were still being made. If you believe that your investors may not see value in wealth management, here’s why they should.

Financial Institution Can Adopt the Model That Fits 

While you might think that the biggest struggle is to have a breakthrough with investors, and enrolling them in your financial planning systems, the real question is where do you take it from there? 

As a financial institution, you have the ability to design your systems and incorporate wealth management components into your practice. Which makes more sense for your investors as they tend to seek out a more holistic approach. 

You see, investors are looking to discuss their entire financial vision with their advisors. Their short term goal is obviously to make smart decisions and see a substantial return on their investment. Their ultimate goal however is none other than prosperity and financial wellness. 

Investors Are Looking for a Financial Wellness Roadmap 

The financial bigger picture has never been more relevant. The pandemic-induced market uncertainty has shaken investors’ confidence in their portfolios and challenged all their strategies. The type of financial institutions they are looking to work with are those able to offer them some clarity and insight into their financial wellness roadmap.

Whilst the unpredictability of the stock market can challenge that concept, it’s all about the relationship your advisors foster with their clients. Here at DNA Behavior we believe that advisors should constantly engage their investors in discussions relevant to them, or risk losing them. 

Wealth Management also Means Behavior Management

You might be asking yourself is it our role to help investors get the maximum profit? Or to manage their behavior?

We believe that wealth management and financial planning risks are at the sum of human behavior (investors and advisors) and market risks. Our whole Financial DNA program for investors and advisors has been predicated on this. Whilst the market itself cannot be managed by an investor, their reaction to it can be. Which comes back to human behavior management. 

75% or more of your role is to save investors from themselves by helping manage their behavior. This involves educating, guiding, coaching and empowering them. What we call “Wealth Mentoring”. 

By adopting this approach you will be helping your investors obtain superior returns which far outweigh any level of fees they are being charged. The reality is that the key to successful investment is managing behavior. Wealth mentoring has the ability of transforming the investor-experience and enhance value.

Recognize, Break Away From Herd Mentality

– First Published on Nasdaq –

one of the challenges financial advisors face is the tendency for their clients to come to them already influenced by “group” think or herd mentality.

“Everybody is buying XYZ; I need to get in on this!”.

“No one is staying in International Doodads. The guys on my Pickle Ball team say I should get out of that and lean into derivatives.”

Clients know the importance of seeking advice from qualified financial industry professionals yet can make life-changing decisions based on a night out with friends or the sensational advice of a grandiloquent radio host.

And, yes, sometimes otherwise smart investors are persuaded by the comfort of a crowd. After all, the advice may come via a relationship through whom they get trusted advice on many other areas of their lives. Or from someone seen as successful…so the advice must be worth following, right?

Coming out of a divisive election year, herd mentality is at the forefront, beyond just the financial sector. So, we have it in perspective; it just should not be part of your investment strategy.

Core insights, core advice

Clear thinking requires financial professionals to be able to understand where enthusiasm for an investment or disinvestment is coming from and how to respond to a client’s bias. An advisor must help that client pivot their thinking in a positive and safer way, visualizing the situation from a different perspective. This, in fact, is a core reason for having a financial advisor or coach.

So how can a financial professional do this? Do they know bias can be revealed?

Financial advisors who are serious about understanding the client behavior invest in a behavioral component for their existing tech stack. The benefit: Revealing a depth and breadth of insight into their clients.

Behavioral insights also alert advisors to those clients who react in the moment and revert to long-held beliefs that often hurt their returns. This could be panicking and selling or excitedly panicking and doubling down on exactly the wrong investment.

Mining for insights

We all know the importance for advisors and clients to separate emotions from investing. But, again, how to actually do that? The trick is learning enough about inherent biases to be able to manage them.

Without that information folded into their workflow, advisors may find themselves locked in emotional exchanges with their clients. Or at least unable to move a client off a damaging commitment to the wrong vision or ill-informed advice.

Behaviorally smart advisors understand that everyone reacts differently to turbulent markets. Having behavior tech insights into a client, they can coach and educate their clients – and do so in ways tailored to each client – to move beyond herd mentality.

Using a behaviorally smart financial discovery, an advisor will know of client biases from the get-go. They will know which clients are likely to field bad advice and take it to heart. Best, they’ll be well-prepared to keep clients from jumping on the latest bandwagon.

The client also would be the beneficiary of these insights, so they can “check themselves before they wreck themselves,” as my mentor, Hugh Massie, likes to say. So, don’t think of behavioral insights as something the advisor holds close; there are insights about the advisor and about the client and all should be shared with each.

Breaking away from the pack

Herd mentality is a dangerous bias. And there is a clear responsibility for financial advisors to ensure they provide clients with highly individualized guidance.

If they are indeed armed with behavioral insights – on themselves and, especially, on their clients – they can even provide proactive guidance when client information might not be congruent with other, external perspectives. 

When an individual and their advisor are equipped with quantifiable insights, they can recognize and break free from the herd. After all, investing is not a group sport.