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What Makes a Great Boss?

The ability of a leader to engage their team is a hot topic these days. The pressure of getting results can often make it difficult to do. Further, typically, many of the people in leadership positions are naturally results oriented people in their behavioral style. You do not see as many leaders who are naturally relationship oriented.

So, the key is how do the results oriented leaders adapt and engage their team on a relationship basis?

What Makes a Great BossA key to this is that the leader firstly understands their own strengths and struggles, and then knows the same of their team members. The team members need to feel understood and be managed uniquely, which means the leader has to adapt. This is what provides the more customized work place experience. The team will then feel appreciated and connected with.

However, there are many more things leaders have to do to in terms of their approach to leadership beyond behavioral awareness. Although, a behaviorally aware leader will more naturally be able to manage his or her team respectfully and meaningfully.

The following article in Inc magazine provides a great list of 10 things bosses can do to engage their employees once they have behavioral awareness – Click Here to Read the article.

The ability of a leader to engage their team is a hot topic these days. The pressure of getting results can often make it difficult to do. Further, typically, many of the people in leadership positions are naturally results oriented people in their behavioral style. You do not see as many leaders who are naturally relationship oriented.

So, the key is how do the results oriented leaders adapt and engage their team on a relationship basis?

A key to this is that the leader firstly understands their own strengths and struggles, and then knows the same of their team members. The team members need to feel understood and be managed uniquely, which means the leader has to adapt. This is what provides the more customized work place experience. The team will then feel appreciated and connected with.

However, there are many more things leaders have to do to in terms of their approach to leadership beyond behavioral awareness. Although, a behaviorally aware leader will more naturally be able to manage his or her team respectfully and meaningfully.

The following article in Inc magazine provides a great list of 10 things bosses can do to engage their employees once they have behavioral awareness: http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/10-things-extraordinary-bosses-do-for-their-employees.html#!

The ability of a leader to engage their team is a hot topic these days. The pressure of getting results can often make it difficult to do. Further, typically, many of the people in leadership positions are naturally results oriented people in their behavioral style. You do not see as many leaders who are naturally relationship oriented.

So, the key is how do the results oriented leaders adapt and engage their team on a relationship basis?

A key to this is that the leader firstly understands their own strengths and struggles, and then knows the same of their team members. The team members need to feel understood and be managed uniquely, which means the leader has to adapt. This is what provides the more customized work place experience. The team will then feel appreciated and connected with.

However, there are many more things leaders have to do to in terms of their approach to leadership beyond behavioral awareness. Although, a behaviorally aware leader will more naturally be able to manage his or her team respectfully and meaningfully.

The following article in Inc magazine provides a great list of 10 things bosses can do to engage their employees once they have behavioral awareness – Click here to read the article.

Tackling Leadership ? Facing Reality, Starting with Yourself

This article from Bill George, Harvard Business School Professor, former Medtronic CEO, and best-selling author, is a great reminder to tackle problems head on and take responsibility as an honorable leader –

In my 2009 book, 7 Lessons for Leading in Crisis, the first lesson when encountering a crisis is to face reality, starting with yourself. This week we have contrasting examples of leaders confronting crises who took sharply different paths: JP Morgans Jamie Dimon and Best Buys Richard Schultz.

Read the rest of the article HERE.

Please read and share your comments. Is there ever a case to sit back and not respond to serious issues as a leader? If so, when is it appropriate? What has been your personal experience in cases like this one?

Read more leadership principles from Lee Ellis on the Leading with Honor blog.

Management Principle: Misfits

In today’s work environments where staff members are promoted to managers and leaders because they were really good at their craft, we oftentimes miss the most important ingredient as to whether they can truly be successful in their new role. Do they really understand how to manage and motivate people? If the answer is “no,” then they may not be ready for the assignment. I hope you like today’s principle on misfits.

DNA Advisor Performance

Misfits. As organizational leaders, we observe people that are difficult to work with and conclude that we have “the wrong people on the bus.” And while that’s always a possibility, it’s not likely that this condition exists to the degree it’s claimed. If we match a person’s assessment results with job requirements, and complete the Human Resource vetting process, it’s more likely that there are other factors at play. Rather than punt and change out team members, professional leaders will discern the staff member’s needs and then methodically manage to cultivate for the right results. The process starts by understanding the strengths and struggles of human nature, and, by being familiar with the many different personality profiles. Effective leaders will then match the styles of their employees which yields genuine influence. Applying proper human incentive systems will cause a staff member to grow and take full responsibility for their domains with improved judgment and insight. Successful executives are those with the patience and determination to develop those who work under their care, converting misfits to champions.

Coaching questions: How many among your staff would you say are misfits? How can you more fully cultivate their behaviors to produce organizational champions?

Read more coaching principles from Dean Harbry on the Internal Innovations website.

Management Principle: Coping

It seems that everyone wants to grow in leadership, and have authority over others, but few are really prepared to do what’s required to lead well. Some of the most respected examples from the past are those who were never daunted or distracted from seemingly impossible goals. They know how to frame and then reframe challenges, creating determination and emotional resolve in their people. I hope you enjoy this week’s principle.
principle on corporate wellness.

Financial Planning insights, financial advisor client, client communication styles, client behavior

Coping.? When we have expectations that are confronted with disappointing results, we require emotional energy to bridge the gap-we cope. However, when the gap between expectations and reality is too large, we are typically unable to cope, resulting in stress behaviors that differ based on one’s temperament and maturity level. Some lose composure, while others become quiet and distant.

Both conditions represent amateur behavior and are obvious to all those who observe. We lose influence. To grow we must develop self-awareness and anticipate situations that undermine our ability to cope. To combat the issue we take a time out, regroup, and regain emotional reserves while maintaining composure. If we fail to regenerate our reserves, we lose the respect of those around us and wane in our ability to lead. When we say “yes” to leadership, we are really saying “yes” to suffering. A glamorized view of leadership results in an inability to emotionally meet the challenges of the office; we forfeit opportunities to model professional behavior, particularly during tough times when others learn the most as a consequence of our responses.

Coaching questions: What’s your coping capacity? How can you strengthen self-awareness and better anticipate your coping gap?

Read more coaching principles from Dean Harbry on the Internal Innovations website.