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Unlocking the Power of DNA Behavior

Over the past few months, Hugh Massie sat down with some of the most influential consultants and entrepreneurs in the financial and behavioral space. What do they all have in common? They’ve been exposed to DNA behavioral’s insights and unlocked its power to move their businesses forward.

When Kenyatta Turner from Freedom Empire Consulting took the Business DNA assessment a few years ago, she had already been on the growth and personal development path. The DNA Behavior assessment brought her not only clarity but the validation that it was time to step away from a career path that no longer served her long-term goals and embrace her true passion.

When Kim Curtis from The Wealth Legacy Institute and Hugh first met, she was seeking to have deeper and more meaningful relationships with her clients, beyond the money factor. So when she was introduced to the DNA Behavior tool, she realized exactly what she was missing. She first took the assessment herself to understand her particular skill sets, then implemented it in her business and her relationships with her clients.

Through her years of experience, Robyn Clay from Linktank realized that being a technology integration expert is similar to being an interpreter. Your role is to facilitate the use of technology by the team. With the support for DNA Behavior’s insight, her competitive advantage has been her strategic approach in connecting people and technology.

The power of DNA is incontestably real. It gives you and your team the strategic advantage you need to move your business forward. If you’re ready to stop the guessing game and leverage our 500+ insights, take our assessment today and let’s uncover your behavioral style.

Financial DNA Empowering Female Voices

Earlier this year, I sat down with Danny Liberatore from The Wealth Enrichment Financial Group to discuss the impact Financial DNA has had on his practice, and how it transformed the way he works with his clients. 

Working with female investors

One of my biggest takeaways from our identity conversation was Danny’s approach in working with female investors. He mentioned that most of his clients are females and that Financial DNA insights have enabled him to foster meaningful relationships with them.

You see, female investors don’t want to be treated any differently than men, however, their communications styles are different. They want to be part of the process. They have a savviness for the intricacies of our work and appreciate the educational part of it all.

Danny Liberatore

Behavioral finance insights particularly come into play in this situation when you are working with male and female partners. Their dynamics unravel from day one, and you need to pay attention to their behaviors in order to understand them better and manage their biases.

Involve both in the conversation

Danny shared with me that most of the time, the women are different from their partners, in terms of behavior and responsiveness. 

It is no secret that the financial service industry has done a very poor job trying to understand women and genuinely helping them. What happens more often than not is that they are being ignored and their opinions are unsolicited or unappreciated. 

As a financial advisor, you need to be able to wear different hats when working with couples. When you make the effort of explaining things differently to your clients and accordingly to their behavioral styles, you get instant breakthroughs. 

Danny mentioned that he’s made it a habit to always address the wife first and disclose to the husband that while he might be addressing him later on separately, he doesn’t want him to feel ignored or unappreciated. He will ensure to bring the husband back into the conversation and keep her engaged.

The truth is, once you honestly explain your process, your clients instantly feel included. It not only puts them at ease, but it builds trust. And we all know that trust is a fundamental factor in advisor/client relationships. 

This is a common situation for FI’s to find themselves in. When the female is not the breadwinner or the creator of the wealth, you’ve got to make her even more involved, without leaving the male out either.

How it usually starts 

When meeting with a potential client for the first time, pay very close attention to the couple dynamics as they unravel before you. It is common for men to take on the lead role in a conversation with their advisor, especially at the beginning. 

However, if it gets to the point where the female’s opinion is not taken into consideration or is not solicited at all in the planning process, that should be a red flag for you. You need to make the effort to always keep them engaged and involve them in the conversation.

You can also look at it from a business perspective. Let’s say you are taking on this new client that has great assets and potential for revenue growth. If you strictly focus on working with the husband, when life happens and you find yourself in an intergenerational wealth transfer situation, what are your chances to still be the financial advisor for that family? 

Final thoughts..

When working with your clients, it might feel normal to engage the one partner that takes on the role of leader and simply overlook the other. The risk you are running there is to not only alienate one of the decision makers but also falling victim to your own status quo biases. Pay attention to your client’s dynamics, keep both of them engaged, and build what could potentially be a lifetime working relationship.

dna behavior community

Who Is Your Community and How Are You Influencing It?

– First Published on Nasdaq –

In many ways, the pandemic denied us access to the ever-important concept of “community.” We had to find new and innovative ways to stay in touch with others.

Still, there is no true substitute for one-on-one or one-on-many connections. Especially those with a range of people with which to build relationships and community.

So, as I conclude my look at what it means to live a quality life, I’m reminded that if 2020 has taught us anything, it should be the importance of having deep social bonds and meaningful relationships. Again, community.

Setting life goals

Along with my growing band of online social network connections, I have deliberated on our life goals, what we want to accomplish and where and how we want to invest our money, realizing that finding the answer to these questions has required each of us to dig deep into our DNA, including the behaviors that drive decision-making, support values and fulfill personal ambitions.

Setting clear life goals is beneficial in several ways. However, setting life goals that make a difference in the world is trickier.

As I review past goals and begin crafting the way forward with a focus on community, I find myself looking to my behavior and asking why I am drawn to certain projects. I am a strategist with a strong drive to reach key goals, based on sound knowledge, high quality processes and quality control standards.

This inherent behavior is not at odds with how I have been going about my quality life. I don’t need to change my behavior, but what I find myself doing is realigning what I have always wanted to do with my life. This past year of isolation has brought that realignment to the fore. So, how to adjust my personal, financial and commercial goals more intentionally to achieve a quality life?

When life goals are based on our values, they are meaningful. When they align with our behavior they allow us to pursue authentic aims of our own choosing and enjoy a feeling of achievement when we get there.

The more I have considered my life goals, how I invest and where I invest, the more I recognize I am charting a course for the next season of my life.

Underpinnings of behavior

My community is more than neighbors or supporting environmental issues; these are a given focus. My community is industry leaders, individuals building a business, and – top of the list – captains of industry facing high-stakes interactions where understanding the behaviors at play will drive solutions for them.

If I’ve learned anything over the past year, it’s that the motivating force beneath any and all behaviors is money.

Business leaders, advisors and investors are now recognizing the influence of behavior and money attitudes on life, and on financial and business performance. Increasingly, a person’s financial behavior is being seen as a derailer of decision-making and relationships, not to mention the achievement of life goals.

Here’s how I’m working on achieving life goals, aligned to passion to support my community: Over the past few weeks I have been conducting one-on-one online conversations with key leaders and professionals representing a wide variety of industries.

The purpose is identifying how their talents and individual EQ plays a role in maximizing their impact and what they have come to understand about their behavior patterns. In every case, so far, there has been a significant moment when understanding their behavior changed the direction of their life.

Big questions lead to simple questions, answers

In all cases each wanted to finish their working day believing they had made a difference for good. So my question to you is this: Who is your community and how are you influencing it?

Check Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself!

I recall the first time I heard Hugh Massie Founder/CEO of DNA Behavior use this phrase. If I remember correctly he was talking about the wild reactions of investors to uncertain markets.

It got me thinking about my behavior and why it is that I don’t get on with everyone, but I do get on with many. I wondered why relationship with some is easy and comfortable and with others is clunky and puts me on edge.

I began to realize that this was an area of behavior I really needed to know more about. I’d always been aware of this even as a young child but had never given it much thinking room.

How, I asked myself, could I empower me to understand why I reacted in these ways and more importantly learn how to manage the awkward stuff.

The nature of my work meant that I had completed most all the ‘personality profile stuff’ available. However, as I looked back over old copies of reports I couldn’t put my finger on what in my profiles addressed this behavioral quirk.

Many years later I completed the DNA Behavior Discovery process and there it was – I am serious and reflective, suspicious, task focused yet group orientated. It was such a lightbulb moment for me as I reflected on the situations and connections that had troubled me and I hadn’t handled well.

I’m not great around overly confident, outgoing, (often noisy) people who invade my thinking time and cause me to react because I’m not a party animal. (How I wish I’d known all this in the tiresome teen years). I’m authoritative and frank and get frustrated when people don’t make quick and well-informed decisions. I’m at my best working with like minded colleagues where my need for reflection and creativity add value and are accepted.

No excuse now for poor response to colleagues, I’m self-aware and can’t blame myself for ignorance because up until some 20+ years ago there wasn’t a scientifically validated profiling system that revealed this for me. But now there is so, no excuse – I am empowered to manage my responses and behavior through self-knowledge.

What I’ve learned is how rich teamwork is when each individual understands their inherent behavior. The more diverse the team the better any outcome is. I welcome my crazy outgoing friends and colleagues; they are the fun. I need my reflective thinkers who no longer frustrate me (well maybe a little) because they are the gatekeepers to our business. I respect, above all else, those pioneers and strategists who have built the business, given me a career and released me to use my behavioral analytical skills to work with and empower others to be able to understand and manage their behaviors.

We are all muddling through trying hard not to mess up relationships but how much better would it be to break bad habits and build good relationships through a deeper understanding of why we respond in the way that we do.

Head over to our website and complete the DNA Behavior Discovery for yourself. It’s FREE and you will receive the outcomes straight away.

I’m on LinkedIn so link and message me if you want to know more about my behavioral journey.

Setting Your Quality Life Purpose

First Published on Nasdaq

More and more these days I’m asked my thoughts on the meaning and quality of life. This global pandemic, including being on social lock down, has caused individuals to have deeper discussions.

Many of us agree that we were having these “life” discussions when we were in college, newly married or considering our career choices. Now as adults facing so much uncertainty in the world, we are returning to these life-shaping talks to review or audit our lives, evaluating where we go next.

Golf and Revelations

I recently received an invitation to attend a golf lesson event via video conference being hosted by a financial planner. This was too random not to attend. But before the event I spoke to the host who told me that he was looking for innovative ways to stay connected, not just with friends but also with clients. So he hired a golf pro to demonstrate not only golf swings but also to give tips on how to “read” a golf course.

His intention was to bring together key people in his life who he knew were having similar life discussions, but not just to talk, but to do and enjoy something together. In this case golf.

He went on to tell me that, over the past three months, he had come to the realization that he was spending far too much time working, building wealth and growing his businesses, and too little time with his family.

Appreciating how many of his early life values were being compromised troubled him, he dug out an old journal from his youth to read. Years before he had written on the first page:

  • I will always be able to articulate my purpose.
  • I will endeavor to have balance in key areas of my life.
  • I will live with purpose and intention.
  • I will responsibly attend to my wants and needs.
  • I will have a plan for giving back to the community.
  • I will be a present and responsible head of my family.

These statements were guided by the values, goals and socio-cultural context in which he lived. Knowing that he had moved so far away from them was troubling.

A Season of Revitalization

After the Zoom golf lesson ended, the ten attendees talked about this being a season of revitalization for them. They talked about catching a new vision for their lives, for their businesses, yet all agreed how far they had drifted from their quality life purpose and plans and how important it was for them to re set their life compass.

Interestingly, we all shared news about the video conferencing events we’d been invited to. Golf was obviously of interest to us as golfers and was a small step toward refocusing our quality life. Even as we talked and laughed about the video conference events we’d been invited to (learning to cook, attending a music recital, exercising at home, portrait painting, dress making), it led us to question what would people in our personal and business world want to be invited to? Clearly not all of us would be interested in such video conference invitations.

What kind of events would we run that add meaning to life? More importantly, how would we even know what quality life and meaning looked like in the lives of those people if we didn’t know them at a deeper level.

This led to a wider conversation. Given that many people were having profound and meaningful conversations and looking at their lives through a completely different lens, how could we work with them or their clients to ensure our service offering genuinely added value to their quality and life goals?

Further, how would we know what those were? As a group we’d forgotten or laid aside our own quality life purpose to some degree. So, how then to now engage with family, friends and clients to understand and gain insight into what a quality life looked like for them?

‘Money Confidence’ Is a Key

From my own perspective I’m already seeing investors keen to understand their financial personality as they make potentially life-changing decisions. They clearly see how understanding their financial personality will build “money confidence” to make decisions that build a quality life performance in the areas of:

  • Life purpose
  • Career
  • Finances
  • Health and Recreation
  • Community
  • Relationships
  • Confidence
  • Wisdom

Over the next few months, I will unpack the importance of understanding how having a clear quality life purpose and plan can lead to significant money confidence. I hope you will join me on this journey that is at once both introspective and collaborative.

Making Behavioral Science Effortless in Workflow

Making Behavioral Science Effortless in Workflow

This article first appeared on Nasdaq.

When advisors and clients relate well and understand how to manage each other’s behavioral and communication differences, those solid foundations lead to repeat business and overall success.

Imagine heading to a meeting with a client and being able to use your smartwatch or other device to take a quick glance to remind yourself of their innate behaviors. Those revealed by the 10-minute assessment they took early in the advisory relationship.

You’d quickly refresh your knowledge of validated ways to best communicate with them. A smoother, more focused meeting. Perhaps quicker. And with improved outcomes.

Visualize knowing in advance, for instance, that this client values work-life balance and won’t budge from goals they have to support their lifestyle. Think about how important it would be to have access to client insights as you step out of the elevator and greet your client.

An insightful road map

Many of us can’t recall our own natural behavior when we are under stress, never mind trying to recall that of our client. But a quick glance at discovery report highlights provides these prompts:

You are motivated by out-of-the-box thinking and brainstorming. On the flip, your client who needs the big picture, action plans and logical key points.

You’re reminded to go into the meeting knowing how to manage the differences between you, including: Dial back your creative thinking and focus on the analytics and rationale, while remaining levelheaded
The world of advice is changing rapidly. Think back over the past few months and consider how often you’ve found yourself acting more as a coach-mentor than a financial advisor.

Robust info revealed in practical ways

Increasingly, and though they may use varying language to express it, advisors are inquiring how to foster this transition to coaching or mentoring.

All acknowledge their clients are smart and have a pretty good handle on their wealth creation in stable times. But they recognize we’re all a bit more emotional and not as consistent in decision making during tumultuous times.

My guidance: Get to know your clients’ natural behavior. It won’t change over time, but under pressure some aspects of their financial personality might cause a “behavioral flip” – so named by behavioral insights guru Hugh Massie – and will need to be managed. (Behavioral flip: Demonstrating behavior that seems to run counter to everyday, no-stress or low-stress behaviors.)

This is not some futuristic thought bubble; this behavioral insight is available now and can be used on any device via a simple integration. And that last point is one I get asked about a lot. Understandably, advisors are busy doing their core work and don’t need an add-on, for lack of a better term, if it’s not a quick and seamless process, including the time involved to get up to speed.

Leverage existing behavior data

Being able to reference and be guided by robust financial behavior data creates curiosity as clients see how empowered they are as they fully understand their inherent decision-making and communication style. This revolutionizes the advisor-client relationship and puts you and your client on the cutting edge.

Get an even better grasp on how to run a client meeting built on actual data and behavioral insight.

Understanding behavior satisfies know-your-client standards – without having to laboriously read piles of client bios – and ups the ante in terms of outcomes on all sides of the relationship.