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Financial Advisors + ID + EI – What Does It All Mean?

It’s an age-old question. How can financial advisors break through emotional barriers to help clients with their finances?

In recent Identity conversations with Canon Financial Institutes Executive Director Certifications, William Trigleth III, Hugh Massie,  Chairman and Founder of DNA Behavior Global, talked about the importance of financial advisers understanding Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Identity (ID) as a starting point to knowing how to manage advisor/client behavioral differences.

Trigleth acknowledged to Massie how the application of the DNA Behavior discovery tools helped advisors identify their emotional hotspots and revealed vital areas where clients’ financial conversations would need to be managed. 

An essential part of Identity is getting to grips with our emotional intelligence. It becomes crucial when financial advisors are discussing finances with their clients. Nothing disturbs emotional equilibrium more than conversations around money.

You can view a short version of the Massie/Trigleth conversation here:

Or head to our YouTube Channel to view the whole Identity conversation.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. Let me explain!

Over the past four months, Hugh Massie has been conducting online conversations with industry leaders worldwide. The discussions have circled the importance of understanding Identity regardless of the industry they lead. 

A large part of the conversations has revealed how closely aligned self-awareness of one’s own Identity and emotional intelligence are. 

So, what is emotional intelligence?  

In his book A Dictionary of Psychology, Andrew Colman defines Emotional Intelligence this way:

Emotional intelligence (EI) is most often defined as the ability to perceive, use, understand, manage, and handle emotions. People with high emotional intelligence can recognize their own emotions and those of others, use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior, discern between different feelings and label them appropriately, and adjust emotions to adapt to environments

There is no doubt financial advisors need to be able to manage behaviors and reactions that their clients have to market movement. Without this understanding, set goals won’t be achieved.

A great starting point is that advisors know themselves first. This self-awareness leading to self-management keeps the advisor very professional. Still, it also ensures their insight positions them to see and manage their clients’ behavior.

‍Remember, the pull of money is a highly emotive subject. Therefore, the more insight an advisor has into their own and their client’s response, the more likely they are to navigate clients through periods of anxiety.

So how can you increase your emotional intelligence? That’s easy. Head over to our website and complete a FREE trial. This is a perfect starting point, and if you want to talk to one of us about the outcomes – no problem, we can do that.

Maybe you think you would benefit from an Identity Conversation with Hugh Massie – let’s see what we can do to set that up.

I will continue to write something about these Identity interviews with these industry leaders. What they are sharing is GOLD. 

Interesting for us is the common thread, i.e., when individuals know their Identity, they can manage money conversations at a whole new level. As a result, they and their clients tend to make significantly better decisions – about money and finances and other things – that could negatively affect them.

Dream Smart Academy Behavioral SuperPowers Community

It’s always interested me to hear stories about how people are using DNA Behavior discovery to cause disruptive transformation in their life and business. Over the past 7 years, the DreamSmart Academy based in Temecula, CA has been growing a movement based on every person knowing their “Behavioral SuperPowers”. This is the essence of the DreamSmart Academy’s Behavioral Identity. People want to know their Behavioral Superpowers and flock to them.
I witnessed this in action as I joined the DreamSmart Academy online graduation event on April 20, 2021. Even though the event was held online the passion for pursuing behavioral self-awareness and understanding how Behavioral Identity impacts overall performance was incredible.

This organization is taking DNA Behavior to inner-city kids, their families, schools, universities, opportunity youth programs, to church leadership, and their congregations. They see the DNA Behavior tools as a behavioral tech solution for individuals, industry leaders, for everyone, and anyone wanting to gain insight into their Behavioral SuperPowers and ultimately their Behavioral Identity. In other words, decode human behavior to make it practically usable for every person.

From financial service industry leaders to business coaches, consultants, and trainers, to pastors – each shared their experience of life-changing ‘light bulb’ moments as they discovered their Behavioral SuperPowers and how powerful this insight is to reshaping their Behavioral Identity and acting as a catalyst for change.

From financial service industry leaders to business coaches, consultants, and trainers, to pastors – each shared their experience of life-changing ‘light bulb’ moments as they discovered their Behavioral SuperPowers and how powerful this insight is to reshaping their Behavioral Identity and acting as a catalyst for change.

I was deeply impressed by the DreamSmart Academy’s application of the DNA Behavior tools and the human energy they have created around them.

They will positively impact a lot of lives and relationships as their Behavioral SuperPowers movement expands.

I will be sharing more over the months ahead about the importance of identity and behavior and revealing more stories from the conversations I am having with others who are practically using behavioral insights to cause a dramatic change in how life and business are done. In the meantime, why not head to our website to begin your own journey to uncovering your identity empowerment. It’s FREE.

Take Fresh Look at Alignment of Career and Life Purpose

– First Published on Nasdaq –

Having a purpose in life that lines up with a chosen career is what many strive for and rarely achieve. Why is that?

Maybe it’s as simple as having allowed yourself to follow the career expectations of others, only to later find life experiences, wisdom, or an event (like a pandemic!) exposes cracks in the alignment between life purpose and chosen profession.

For many, the past year has caused them to take a hard look at their life purpose and ask the questions:

  • Why am I building wealth?
  • Is this my chosen career?
  • Why am I endeavoring to achieve the next promotion?
  • Why am I allowing life to hijack deeply held life goals and purpose?

Learning from the past

As I look back on my own journey, I often joke, saying I am a “reformed CPA,” but I seriously am. Having initially had a successful career as a chartered accountant in Sydney, Singapore and Thailand, and later in the financial services industry (running my own wealth management business), I always knew my career was more than about me conforming to a way of life.

That is, conforming to the script of have a good job, buy a house, invest and increase wealth. I think you get my point. But in reality, I always recognized something was missing.

My talents made me successful in my chosen careers but did not fulfill my passion, vision and values which I wanted to define and articulate in my life purpose.

I can’t say I was overly navel-gazing or looking for meaning in life; it was simply a deep belief that something more was going to be my career and purpose. The trouble was I didn’t know what.

Getting back to basics

I began to realize that if I wanted to discover my TIPS (talent, identity, purpose and significance) and get my career and life purpose aligned, I would have to do something about it myself. Hence the birth of DNA Behavior.

I recognized that using a behaviorally smart scientifically based discovery system I would be able to uncover areas of my TIPS that were not being recognized or used in my career – or toward my life purpose.

So, some 20+ years ago I founded the DNA Behavior business. It became clear to me that everyone should know and be able to share their unique “DNA style” with family, advisors, leaders, employees and clients. I knew that if everyone could share their unique style, the world would be a better place and careers would be chosen that lined up with living a quality life and inherent passions.

What I discovered and have spent the intervening years pursuing: My purpose and priorities lay in helping people the world over become more self-empowered through greater self-awareness. What I found is that I have a knack for discovering and making practical, unique behavioral insights, particularly in the still-new, still-underutilized field of behavioral finance. This is a much stronger calling for me than providing accounting and financial services, investments, and managing real estate.

The highly validated, scientifically based, structured approach to understanding behavioral insights for identifying talents, career paths and life purpose helped me discover my passion and now does the same for millions of people globally.

There is of course an irony – and a win-win – to the fact that my personal discovery and pursuit of that will enable the same for others. Of this I am doubly grateful.

And this is not a sales pitch; rather, it’s sharing an experience about discovering life purpose and making a career from that discovery.

Sometimes life intercedes

During the past year I have spent socially distant or remote time with countless people who are questioning many aspects of their lives. Now many are reviewing their career. Not because they have lost their job, but because they’ve had time to work from home with their family and have begun to “taste” a quality life.

They want to do life differently. They want to use technology to be able to have choices about where and when they work. Even more have commented on how successful conversations have become with their advisors as many financial advisors are themselves questioning their quality life.

One common theme in these conversations: It seems creating significant wealth is no longer their “true north,” not because they don’t want wealth but because they genuinely cannot find its purpose in their lives.

Wealth is great, but not at the sacrifice of life purpose. Why not have both?

Know yourself, then help clients do same

Discovering a life purpose that becomes a satisfying career needs to follow a well-defined approach that begins, not necessarily with qualifications, but with knowing self (talents, strengths and struggles). Focusing on those factors that reveal inherent behavior is crucial before setting personal life goals that enable you to take control of life in ways that optimize performance and happiness.

This approach to building a career based on life purpose is a strategy you can take to your clients as part of discussing financial planning and investment strategies, because many are searching for purpose and meaning. Even better if you lead the discussion with how you have rediscovered yourself, re-examined your goals and re-aligned key life facets like purpose and direction.

Help Clients on Their Life Journey; You’ll Both Win

– First Published on Nasdaq –

As I continue focusing on living a quality life, I’m reminded that changing direction requires confidence.

At a recent speaking engagement I was approached by a young man who wanted to talk about family wealth succession planning, a topic I love and know well. His family was in discussion with their advisors about the transfer of the family fortune to this young man (the heir). His parents were staunch believers that the wealth should be used to advance the business, build more houses, plazas and entertainment centers.

With his father’s failing health, all discussion with the children had passed to the family wealth advisors.

The heir (let’s call him David – not his real name) believed his role was to move the family wealth into other areas. He conceded his parents had always generously contributed to good causes but David had much bigger quality life goals in mind. What he lacked was the confidence to set out to his parents and the advisors just how he would use the family wealth with meaning.

Wealth impact and purpose

Many of his parents’ friends also were in the building development business; it seemed to be a trend for them all. Yet David was determined to invest the wealth into rehabilitation farms (or what some would call drug rehabilitation centers). Both he and his wife and his two siblings saw their future lay with providing sanctuaries for young men and women who had lost their way.

I will pause here to note that it is optimal when the siblings agree on future direction. That is not always the case in family wealth and succession planning. So, in this way, David and his siblings had an important positive aspect in their favor.

He knew this vision would take hard conversations with his parents, and, more concerning, with their financial advisors. But, again, he simply did not have the confidence for these difficult conversations.

An advisor knowledge gap

The advisors had never included David or his siblings in past conversations and so were unaware of the way in which this generation wished to change the direction of family wealth creation. Put more simply, the advisors did not know what was important to David in terms of life choices and direction. And what his parents decide to do with their money would have an enormous impact on him and his siblings.

The advisors were making no obvious attempt to bring the family together collaboratively to have “transfer discussions,” and this young man felt ill equipped to challenge them.

Clients, advisors both learn

David had completed a scientifically based behavioral discovery process as part of the event where I was speaking. I could see from the outcome that he was community-minded and had an above-average ability to manage risk. He was thoughtful, structured and able to pursue goals.

I explained to David that his confidence lay in his inherent behavior. I encouraged him to convene a family meeting to share his quality life goals for the future.

Each family member should complete a financial-life planning tool to objectively uncover their different behavioral styles, communication styles, talents, life motivations and money attitudes. Only then should they work with family wealth advisors to create a wealth transfer

Helping family members gain the clarity to choose between the many options in their life and increasing family member self-awareness so they more confidently make committed decisions should be a starting point for all family advisors. Using things like a behavioral discovery to accomplish this is not yet the norm, but it’s quickly on the rise.

It’s never easy to structure engaging family relationship meetings nor to keep them aligned and focused to achieve family succession goals. But it is vital to include all relevant family members.

Moving ahead confidently

I learned later that David had indeed convened a family meeting and, based on each members’ Financial DNA, discussed the direction he and they wanted to take family wealth in the future. He used what I’ll call his revealed talents, life motivations and financial personality insights to devise a well laid out, structured family wealth playbook, including his life goals.

His confidence had increased significantly because the behavioral discovery exercise helped him know – and helped him communicate – who he was and how to manage his behavior and use his talents. In short, David had discovered how to articulate his life goal passion and this increased his confidence.

As an aside, his parents were fully supportive of this change of direction for the family business and wealth. Seeing the confidence in their son only served to excite them to support him. In fact, when the family and advisors met to plan the wealth transition the patriarchs insisted David lead and facilitate the meeting.

A better world: One quality life at a time

With realization of one’s own potential and self-confidence in one’s ability, one can build a better world. – Dalai Lama

Lesson to advisors: Include all family members in transition discussions. Remember that, according to investment data, 66% of children fire their parents’ financial adviser after they receive an inheritance.

My encounter with David once again reminded me that confidence plays a huge role in everyone’s plans and, in particular, when they want to make a life change. Living a quality life for many has become front and center, especially as many re-evaluate their plans, life and wealth in the midst of COVID.

2020 was a year like no other. A year when conversations were deeper and when talking about the way we “do life” was questioned. Yet it is worth remembering that confidence – that is, feeling sure of ourselves and our abilities in a realistic, secure way and having a quiet inner knowledge that we’re capable – is what is needed to change direction toward leading a quality life.

Help your clients discover their life purpose. By doing so you’re more likely to end up with clients for life.

Our Word for 2021 Is Authenticity

It has been a frequent practice as of late to choose a focus word that would sum-up your current or upcoming year. The purpose of it is to set an intention, a goal you seek to achieve, or a quality of some sort that you want to ensure you actions throughout the year are being filtered by.

The start of a year is usually a natural time to reflect, celebrate, and plan. What has been known for decades as new year’s resolution has now been reframed as new years intentions.

This is something that we at DNA Behavior have been doing for years. We built our process to be inclusive of many qualities, the main one being authenticity. You see the process of gathering scientifically based behavioral data is interesting. Filled with comments and contradictions.

We at DNA Behavior have seen and heard them all. The most often heard is:

  • that is such an accurate report about me
  • I thought completing the process would be easier
  • but the process was hard
  • I didn’t know which way to respond
  • I had to just go for it
  • look at how accurate the outcomes are
  • I really like the DNA results, but the journey was hard

And so much more. We make no apologies for the 10-minute DNA Natural Behavior Discovery questionnaire using 138 different words in 46 interlocking Forced Choice Questions. The questions are deliberately tight so that a specific outcome is achieved. Definitely, a right data in, right data out approach has been taken.

We know the importance of being able to authentically defend our discovery process is why we are so well positioned in the marketplace. When the DNA Discovery Process was designed it was critical, too, that the questions removed situational, cultural and educational biases and could not be easily gamed. Further, at all costs we wanted highly predictive measurable behavioral insights which would be universally applicable across the globe for all people and remain true for the long term regardless of the situation or circumstances the person is in. In other words, it would get to the core of who the person is. We knew this holy grail of behavioral measurement could be achieved and is forever grateful for the knowledge and guidance of Carol Pocklington and Lee Ellis to show the pathway.

Yes, we could simplify the questionnaire, but why would we? That said, we listened to our customers, and one of the important business keys we discovered was that customer concerns are a rich source of marketing material. One of our friends – David Rendell talks about in Freak Marketing that looking to your greatest weaknesses will be sitting your greatest strength.

If customers were loving the outcome but not the process, what was this saying about our discovery process? We discovered (though we knew it) that our process may be antagonizing our customers by the tight choices it asks them to make when choosing Most Like and Least Like from 3 non-situational words or phrases across 46 questions. Some say, I am all of those in about 6 to 8 of the questions.

What the questions are doing is getting the participant to prioritize their greatest strengths/talents. It is not saying for the 3 choices they are not like them in any way. In varying degrees, we exhibit all the words in some situations. It is more about how regularly and strongly the behaviors are exhibited.

Overall, we found ourselves being able to offensively defend the questionnaire since it more reliably delivered better, deeper and more incisive insights into unique behaviors over long time periods. Again, when you must make serious decisions, do you want to participate in a fun and sometimes lengthy process which gives you a shallow and unreliable result? Or, would you rather participate in a quick but tight process which provides a deep set of very accurate insights that will be true for your life time?

Our purpose with the DNA Discovery process is to uncover the natural DNA behavior that sits below the surface; it is not seen because it is masked by the more dynamic (situational) learned behaviors that are shaped by the person’s life experiences, education and values.

Therefore, a person’s overall personality, at any stage of their life, may be seen to change, but their core natural behavior will remain very consistent. Further, revealing core natural behavior draws out their inherent talents, strengths and struggles (blind spots) and communication styles.

The DNA Behavior Natural Discovery Process was designed to holistically uncover, capture and measure all dimensions of a person’s natural DNA behavioral style as the core of their personality. That is their ingrained, go-to, hard-wired behavior that was set by the time they were 3 years old. This is how people inherently make decisions, take direction and work with others; how they interact and build relationships, achieve results, handle information, complete tasks, develop trust, set and achieve goals, take and live with risks and their learning styles. This also includes their communication style, financial decision-making style, behavioral (finance) biases and their response to market movement (as an example).

After significant academic research and discussions with our independent team of experts, we selected the Forced Choice Assessment Model over the more traditionally used Normative (Likert-type) Scaling Model for measuring Natural DNA behavior. This led to the design of the DNA Natural Behavior Discovery Process; a system capable of assessing 8 major personality factors as well as 24 related sub-factors. The fact we can reliably measure 32 behaviors from 138 words across 46 questions is remarkable given that other systems need 15 to 25 questions to measure 1 behavior with less accuracy.

So, what is the Forced Choice Assessment- The traditional Forced Choice Assessment format is a descriptor used in psychometrics to signify a specific type of measure in which respondents compare two or more desirable options and pick the one that is most preferred. This is contrasted with measures that use Normative/Likert-type scales, in which respondents choose the score (e.g. 1 to 5) which best represents the degree to which they agree with a statement. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ipsative

A correctly structured Forced Choice format using singular words (versus sentences and statements) presents the individual with item options that are equal in desirability with situational, cultural and educational biases removed; this ensures response choices they make will be far less likely to be influenced by social desirability, circumstances, experiences education or environment. Therefore, the outcomes will reveal inherent behaviors, hardwired core traits and strengths and struggles of the person being assessed which are universally applicable.

We are aggressively authentic in defending our method, the outcomes and the process. Were not embarrassed about this. Our approach is intentional.

Tight questions, using the Forced Choice methodology, get great life results and outcomes which are very strong. This enables individuals to understand their unique inherent behavior and from that position make strong life and business decisions.

The Forced Choice format forces the participant to instinctively choose their answer, and respond more truthfully, as there is not one obviously desirable quality to pick from. Also, the Forced Choice format reduces the potential for the participant to agree or disagree. A Forced Choice format using triads of items (a block of 3) enables greater insight into the interactions between the items for enabling more specific measurement of the behavioral factors (traits).

Further – the results place behavioral knowledge firmly in the hands of the individual. From this position –

  • They are better able to understand who they are in terms of strengths and struggles.
  • They have substance upon which to base life, financial and business decisions.
  • It tells people how to manage their communication style.
  • It reveals talents both overt and hidden that can be applied to career choices.

One of the important outcomes of this discovery approach is to understand that strengths, (upon which most people focus) can, under certain circumstances, become struggles and are difficult to manage without self-awareness and knowledge.

Why not spend 10 to 12 minutes learning about your own unique natural DNA style. Take the Business DNA Natural Behavior Discovery process or the Financial DNA Natural Behavior Discovery Process. Use the link below to take you to the questionnaire.

This scientifically based and validated discovery will reveal significant aspects of your natural behavioral style that is the core of your personality. It will help you as make healthy life, business and financial decisions.

Contact us if you would like to discuss this. Our highly skilled consultants will provide you with feedback on the discovery and help you to take the next step in building a behaviorally smart life. To learn more, please speak with one of our DNA Behavior Specialists (LiveChat), email inquiries@dnabehavior.com, or visit DNA Behavior

A Fresh Look at Wisdom and the Way Forward

– First Published on Nasdaq –

In the midst of the pandemic, and particularly with vaccines and a new year on the way, we’re all more reflective. A direct benefit of such reflection is a willingness to change and reinvent. Where are you in this process?

As I continue my quality life journey – after all, isn’t that what we’re all on? – I’m reminded that, even with the best intentions, having the wisdom to make good decisions is foundational. Those decisions may be about life purpose, finances, relationships or…?

To wit, Plato believed that wisdom was theoretical or abstract. Aristotle, his pupil, disagreed, saying that wisdom was a kind of moral compass that guides our thinking and behavior. Whatever philosopher(s) you follow, there is no doubt gaining wisdom is worth pursuing.

How else can we make the best decisions for our lives, yet reflect on the theories, wisdom and experience of others and see what that might spark in ourselves?

Parsing and deploying wisdom

Central to my continuing pursuit of a quality life: I understand the importance of applying wisdom to the financial and life decisions I make. You might say that’s one of my superpowers that comes from the natural DNA behavior of being extremely rational. That’s coupled with the ability to quickly turn vision into practical reality and being able to easily make sense of messy situations and complicated information. We all have a superpower; it just varies individually.

And, knowing that I am goal-driven, that I will revel in complex challenges and that I will take initiative, it was important for me to understand and measure my level of wisdom. Yes, there are behavioral science tools that enable such measurement.

This measurable wisdom didn’t come without being self-aware, researching, surrounding myself with quality thought leaders and investing in educating myself. While I am inherently wise, I also know the importance of gaining knowledge and applying it judiciously.

As a single man, wisdom in making decisions was never an issue. What changed was becoming a family man, as the needs of others had to be built into my thinking. This is a good lesson for all: Your foundational behaviors do not change, but factors around them do and must be accounted for.

This Family Phase of life is when I began to understand the differences of practical wisdom. That is, knowing the right thing to do in a particular circumstance through understanding that particular circumstance, knowing what matters, and effectively reasoning to bring about what matters. The means to an end.

Practical versus theoretical

Theoretical wisdom is knowledge of things that don’t change. (Akin to unchanging innate behavior, which I talk about a lot because it is at the core of my work.) Then there are ethics – about what is really right and wrong…what is living well and living badly, as stated well in “Key Concepts in Practical Philosophy,” by David Arnaud and Tim LeBon.

Financial decision-making was my first real entry into the whole area of wisdom and decision-making. As a young man I was constantly confused by financial advisors who thought they understood me sufficiently to push investment opportunities my way. I never recall having a conversation about my life goals or reasons for wealth creation.

Their insight must have hinged – or so they thought – on generic or theoretical wisdom, because it certainly was not specific to me, the client.

So, began my (life and career) journey into understanding the importance of gaining wisdom through self-awareness, knowledge, experience and recognizing that I had, for example, a built-in, very high tolerance for financial market movements. And tolerance and resiliency around extreme life and business changes.

Put another way, I can quickly see changes coming and innately know what to do to position myself for the future. Also, with experience and with a rationale mind, I have learned to look at patterns of situations and the messages flowing out of them to discern what to do next. And the vision to synchronize and share that insight with others who needed to understand me in order to work with or advise me.

It became clear to me as I moved through life that wealth creation needed to have a purpose. Family security was obviously at the top of the list, but equally important was a quality life focus. THAT is the difference between theoretical and practical wisdom.

Wisdom, goals & wealth creation

The pandemic has clearly redefined direction for many people, and I’m no exception. Remote working has not harmed my business and the same can be said of many of our clients. Of course, like many others, I have had to invest in additional technology to make communication more effective, but in truth I – with my team – have continued to strategize and run and grow our global business (predominantly online).

In fact, over the last 8 or so years we had been moving the business to a virtual environment so we could be flexible and nimble, knowing that the world had become increasingly dynamic with fundamental business changes taking place every 2 years. The intuitive sense to do this could be said to be innate wisdom at work driven by rationality.

So, where does wisdom fit in this quality life scenario? For me, information alone is not wisdom. I believe wisdom is found in our own insight and the ability to piece together multiple bits of information to build a clearer picture. If nothing else, this period of being on lockdown has enabled many to rethink the life and lifestyle they have been leading.

Many of my friends and colleagues are reflecting on insights they’ve had. Often this is a reflection of ideas, life directions, goals and direction(s) they had in their youth. This fresh awakening of wisdom – and questioning the quality direction of their lives – is providing answers for the here and now.

And, yes, all of this can and should lead to conversations with financial advisors. Why? Wealth creation decisions are – and should be – made around life goals. And life goals are not the same for every person or even for the same people at different stages.

What role wisdom as life realigns?

If we’ve survived with remote working, can/should this approach continue? As our own opportunities increase, who can we help? Where can we make a difference? Who needs to be brought alongside us and coached?

All these thoughts have come not just from coping with a global virus but from knowing the importance of applying wisdom to our quality of life going into the future.

How will you calibrate your wisdom and sync such with quality life goals? In turn, how will you enable that to drive your work with and on behalf of clients, all the while helping them discover their balance for wisdom-quality life-financial decision-making?