Employee engagement

Three Ways to Improve Your Company’s Employee Engagement

David Mizne is a thought leader on workforce potential. We thought our friends in human resources, HRtech and related disciplines might appreciate this article on employee engagement, including input from DNA Behavior’s Chief Learning Accelerator, Nikki Evans, about how Business DNA might be leveraged.

Your employees offer significantly better performance and value when they’re engaged but building better employee engagement throughout your business is often easier said than done. Individual employees have different desires and priorities in the workplace and keeping everyone happy can be a challenge if you don’t know where to begin.

Luckily, there are proven ways to start monitoring your company’s employee engagement and making improvements to your current approach. Even if you already have an effective performance management system, these three strategies can help you build stronger relationships with your employees and translate into higher engagement.

Encourage Open Communication

Communication is an incredibly important element of a strong company culture, and creating open lines of communication must begin at the top. This isn’t a process that can be completed overnight, so look for manageable ways to help employees feel more comfortable being honest with their ideas, feedback, and questions so everyone in your company can feel included.

Leading by example is a great way to demonstrate the kind of environment you want to build. Start by making more personal connections with your employees and show that you’re interested in their lives beyond work performance. This can be a simple as walking around different parts of the building and striking conversation with coworkers outside of the normal work discussions.

“Remember that an important part of communicating is truly listening,” says Nikki Evans, a certified professional coach who is Chief Learning Officer for DNA Behavior International. “Make sure you are prepared to take time to truly listen if you are going to start a conversation; be invested in the conversation.”

Ask for Employee Feedback

Employees who feel comfortable being vulnerable are more inclined to provide constructive and actionable feedback. Allowing employees to bring forward their own creative ideas will show them that you are actively listening and value their contributions.

You can also collect regular feedback from your entire workforce that measures how they feel about their role at the company. This is a great chance to ask for specific, targeted feedback and changes they feel could help the business become more efficient.

“Make sure to include your responses to feedback,” DNA’s Evans says. “Not all feedback may be actionable or reasonable at present, but if employees feel like feedback never changes anything, they may stop participating. Let them know how you are evaluating, implementing or even putting their ideas on hold so that they know you are considering them carefully, rather than just ignoring them.”

Express Staff Appreciation

Employees who don’t feel like a valued part of their company can result in increased turnover and decreased performance across teams and departments. Giving appreciation fulfills a basic human need that so many companies forget to tap into. Even a simple “thank you” can be enough to remind someone that they’re more than just a cog in your company’s machine. No one wants to feel like “just a number.”

Businesses can show staff appreciation in different ways, and you can make this as creative or simplistic as you like. Giveaways, after-work events or prizes can show your employees that you truly care about them. This can also play a huge part in improving both performance and overall engagement.

Whether it’s communication, feedback, appreciation or other facets of employee engagement (and HR in general), Evans says a validated behavioral talent insight tool (think probing questionnaire) can provide an edge to organizations focused on employee engagement.

“Imagine being able to tailor aspects of engagement based on individuals and teams,” she says. “For instance, what communication method and style will be most effective with them, or how and when feedback will be most effective for them to provide or receive and, yes, what acts of appreciation will resonate.”

There’s no single way to build better employee engagement, but these three strategies are great starting points that can be used for businesses of any and all sizes. By going back to the basics, you can begin to regain trust with each employee and reevaluate your engagement strategies by using the candid feedback you receive.

David Mizne, Content Manager at 15Five interviews some of the most brilliant minds in business and reports on topics ranging from entrepreneurship to employee engagement. 15Five is a SaaS company with a powerful and simple solution that gathers critical insights from employees in minutes each week, enabling informed management to get the visibility they need to boost engagement and drive alignment across their entire team.

David Mizne

David Mizne

David Mizne is a thought leader on workforce potential. We thought our friends in human resources, HRtech and related disciplines might appreciate this article on employee engagement, including input from DNA Behavior's Chief Learning Accelerator, Nikki Evans, about how Business DNA might be leveraged.

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